MaconCatalog : Townsend School of Music : GRADUATE MUSIC COURSES (MUS)
 
GRADUATE MUSIC COURSES (MUS)
MUS 501. Music History Review I: Antiquity – 1750 (1 hour)
Students are placed in MUS 501 Music History Review I: Antiquity – 1750 based upon individual results of the Music History Diagnostic Examination administered before the student’s matriculation into the Master of Music program. This course is designed to help the student review historical and musicological concepts, specific to the time period, necessary for study in MUS 620 Historical Study of Musical Styles and Literature and as preparation for comprehensive examination in music history. A grade of S must be awarded in order for the student to enroll in MUS 620. (Every Year, Fall Semester)
MUS 502. Music History Review II: 1750 to Present Times (1 hour)
Students are placed in MUS 502 Music History Review II: 1750 – Present Times based upon individual results of the Music History Diagnostic Examination administered before the student’s matriculation into the Master of Music program. This course is designed to help the student review historical and musicological concepts, specific to the time period, necessary for study in MUS 620 Historical Study of Musical Styles and Literature and as preparation for comprehensive examination in music history. A grade of S must be awarded in order for the student to enroll in MUS 620. (Every Year, Spring Semester)
MUS 556. Music Theory Review (1 hour)
Students are placed in MUS 556 Music Theory Review based upon individual results of the Music Theory Diagnostic Examination administered before the student’s matriculation into the Master of Music program. This course is designed to help the student review concepts of music theory form and analysis necessary for study in MUS 656 Analytical Techniques I and as a preparation for comprehensive examination in music theory. A grade of S must be awarded in order for the student to enroll in MUS 656. (Every Year, Fall Semester)
 
Applied Music Courses
One-hour private lesson each week with an expectation of 2 hours of rehearsal per day is worth 2 credit hours. One-hour private lesson each week with an expectation of 4 hours of rehearsal per day is worth 4 credit hours. Applied music courses may be repeated for credit.
MUS 560 (1-2 hours credit), MUS 565 (4 hours credit). Voice
(Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 561 (1-2 hours credit), MUS 566 (4 hours credit). Piano
(Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 562 (1-2 hours credit), MUS 567 (4 hours credit). Organ
(Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 569 (1-2 hours credit), MUS 574 (4 hours credit). Harpsichord
(Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 563 (1-2 hours credit), MUS 568 (4 hours credit). Instrumental (non-keyboard)
(Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
 
A. Flute/Piccolo
N. Tuba
B. Oboe
R. Percussion
C. Bassoon
T. Harp
D. Clarinet
V. Guitar
E. Saxophone
W. Violin
J. Cornet/Trumpet
X. Viola
K. Horn
Y. Violin/Cello
L. Trombone
Z. Double-bass
M. Euphonium
 
 
MUS 540. Applied Piano: Collaborative I (2 hours)
This applied lesson is weekly private instruction on vocal, instrumental, and chamber music with piano. This lesson sequence is designed to study the techniques and artistry of accompanying. This course will also continue the study of a certain degree of piano solo repertoire. Equal emphasis will be placed on vocal and instrumental collaborative piano repertoire. In addition to weekly private instruction, a weekly studio class is mandatory.
Each student will be assigned music majors to accompany for the semester. As well, you may also be assigned to accompany a chamber instrumental or choral ensemble. You will be required to meet weekly for lessons and rehearsals with each assigned student or chamber group. You will also be responsible for accompanying each student in studio classes, student recitals, and juries. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 541. Applied Piano Collaborative Piano II (2 hours)
Prerequisite: completion of MUS 540 or permission of instructor.
This lesson sequence is a continuation of MUS 540. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 542. Applied Piano: Advanced Collaborative I (Vocal) (2 hours)
Prerequisite: completion of MUS 540 and MUS 541 or permission of the instructor.
This lesson sequence will include weekly private instruction specializing in vocal repertoire with piano. This will include art song, opera, and oratorio literature. Study of some solo piano repertoire is required. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 543. Applied Piano: Advanced Collaborative II (Vocal) (2 hours)
Prerequisite: completion MUS 542 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a continuation MUS 542. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 544. Applied Piano: Advanced Collaborative I (Chamber) (2 hours)
Prerequisite: collaborative Piano I and II or permission from instructor.
This course will include weekly private instruction specializing in chamber, sonata, medium-length, and vignette repertoire for piano and other instruments. Study of some solo piano repertoire will be required. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 545. Applied Piano: Advanced Collaborative II (Chamber) (2 hours)
Prerequisite: completion of MUS 544 or permission of instructor.
This course is a continuation of MUS 544. Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 575. Graduate Recital (0 hour)
Graduate students are required to register for Graduate Recital during the semester the performer gives a faculty juried graduate recital counting toward the fulfillment of the graduate recital requirement. This course may be repeated only if the content of the recital is completely different from a previous MUS 575 recital. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 595. Graduate Ensemble (1 hour)
Participation in an ensemble that is appropriate for a student's performance discipline. May include choral and/or instrumental ensembles, chamber music, and opera. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semester)
MUS 601. Supervised Music Ministry Experience (1 hour)
Designed to meet the needs of students preparing for the music ministry. Students will be assigned to work with appropriate staff members of a local church in a church music leadership position. Students are required to complete one semester of supervised ministry experience, which will be taken after the student's first semester of study. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 605. Introduction to Graduate Studies in Music (3 hours)
An introduction to music research tools, materials, and techniques. The course will provide a study of bibliographical materials and methods of research. The focus of the course will include major references and indexes, databases, and Internet research. (Every Year, Fall Semester)
MUS 610. Comprehensive Exam Research and Review (1 hour)
Following either a deferred attempt or an unsuccessful attempt to write the comprehensive examination, students must enroll in MUS 610 comprehensive Exam Research and Review to maintain continuous enrollment towards her/his degree during the 5th - 8th semesters of study. Credit for this class will not count towards degree requirements. All course requirements must be completed before enrollment of MUS 610. (Every Year, Fall and Spring Semesters)
MUS 620. Historical Study of Musical Styles and Literature (3 hours)
A series of graduate-level seminar courses in music history. Topics will be announced in advance, will focus primarily on periods of music history, and drawn from the following: Music in the Ancient World and Renaissance, Music in the Baroque Era, Classicism in Music, Romanticism in Music, 20th Century Music, American Music, and other specialized topics related to music history. This course may be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. (Every Year, Spring Semester)
MUS 621. Service Playing (2 hours)
A study of the special skills required of the organist and organist-director in effective and imaginative worship. Particular emphasis will be placed upon hymn playing, strict and free improvisation, choral accompanying, and the use of a repertoire appropriate to church settings. (Occasionally)
MUS 622. Collaborative Piano Vocal Literature I (2 hours)
This course is a survey of vocal literature and collaborative piano with an emphasis on German, French and English art song repertoire (as well as selected Italian, Russian, Scandinavian, Spanish). Class sessions will be diverse and will include lectures, listening, project presentations, written and aural exams; and performance of assigned vocal and piano literature. Outside assignments will include research, listening and preparation of projects. (Fall semester, odd years)
MUS 623. Collaborative Piano Vocal Literature II (2 hours)
Prerequisite: completion of MUS 622 or permission of the instructor.
This course is a survey of vocal literature and collaborative piano with an emphasis on opera and oratorio repertoire. Class sessions will be diverse and will include lectures, listening, project presentations, written and aural exams; and performance of assigned vocal and piano literature. Outside assignments will include research, listening and preparation of projects. (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 625. Opera History and Literature (2 hours)
A survey of the operatic repertoire beginning in the pre-Baroque era origins through the present day. Content of this course will include lecture, project presentation, study of informed performance practice, listening, and aria preparation and presentation. (Fall semester, even years)
MUS 626. Oratorio Aria Preparation (1 hour)
This performance lab course is designed to aid the student in preparing and performing arias from the oratorio repertoire through study of informed performance practice and in-class coaching and performance of assigned literature. (Spring semester, odd years)
MUS 631. Church Music Administration and Philosophy (2 hours)
This course will address the practical elements of music ministry, including leadership qualities, functioning on a church staff, designing and leading worship, and effective leadership as a pastoral musician. The course will also capture a vision and philosophy of utilizing music and the arts in worship and discuss ways to articulate and implement that vision. (Fall semester, even years)
MUS 632. Hymnology (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide a survey of the historical development of congregational song in the Western church experience. Areas covered will include the early Christian era and the development of hymnody, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, developments resulting from the evolution of various Protestant groups, text-music relationships, and trends of church music into the 21st century. (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 633. Survey of Choral Literature: Renaissance & Baroque (2 hours)
A survey of choral literature from 1450-1750. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a broader knowledge of the choral literature from these periods, and gaining a better understanding of musical styles and performance practice unique to each.
(Fall semester, even years)
MUS 634. Survey of Choral Literature: Mid-18th Century to Present (2 hours)
A survey of choral literature from 1750-present. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a broader knowledge of the choral literature from the Classical, Romantic, and 20th-century periods, and gaining a better understanding of musical style and performance practice unique to each. (Fall semester, odd years)
MUS 636. Pedagogy of an Orchestral Instrument (2 hours)
This course focuses on development of pedagogical skills for a specific orchestral instrument. Included will be study of performance literature, teaching methods/strategies, and maintenance related to the selected orchestral instrument. (Every year, as requested)
MUS 637A. Organ Skills I (2 hours)
This course focuses on development of pedagogical skills as they pertain to the organ. The class will address methods, materials, problems of manual and pedal technique, and registration. (Every year, as requested)
MUS 637B. Organ Skills II (2 hours)
This course is a continuation of MUS 637A. (Every year, as requested)
MUS 638. Vocal Pedagogy (2 hours)
This course is designed to develop a basic understanding of the physical and acoustical foundations of singing. On the basis of this understanding, the student will (1) improve his or her own singing and (2) become a better teacher of singing on the individual level and in a group context. (Spring semester, odd years)
MUS 639A. Piano Pedagogy I (1 hour)
This course focuses on development of pedagogical skills for the piano. Included will be study of keyboard literature from the Robertsbridge Codex (1320) until the present and supervised teaching of piano lessons given by the graduate student. (Fall semester, odd years)
MUS 639B. Piano Pedagogy II (1 hour)
This course is a continuation of MUS 639A. (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 640. Graduate Choral Conducting & Techniques (2 hours)
Advanced studies in conducting a choral ensemble. The course will focus on the elements of choral sound, the expressive elements of text, score study, and rehearsal techniques. (Every year, Fall semester)
MUS 641. Graduate Instrumental Conducting and Techniques (2 hours)
Advanced studies in conducting instrumental ensembles. The course will focus on conducting gestures, musical expression, score study, rehearsal techniques, and leading orchestra and wind ensemble groups. (Every year, Fall semester)
MUS 642. Applied Conducting: Choral or Wind Ensemble (2 hours)
This course will include a weekly, one-hour private lesson. Additionally, students may be required to attend a one-hour studio class session each week. Permission of the conducting teacher is required. This course may be repeated for credit. (Every year, Fall and Spring semesters)
MUS 643. Graduate Seminar in Choral Conducting (2 hours)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in MUS 640 or MUS 641
This course will provide further study in hand and baton technique, refining conducting gesture, score analysis and preparation, rehearsal methods, and developing an approach to performance that is historically informed. (Every year, Spring semester)
MUS 645. Survey of Orchestral Literature (2 hours)
Survey of major orchestral, opera and ballet works from the Baroque to the twenty-first centuries. In-depth study of selected works based on each student’s major field of interest. Projects will include an analysis of one work from each period of music. The analysis must include form, harmonic structure, performance considerations and rehearsal procedures. Score identification, listening and interpretation will be required for mid-term and final exams. (Every year, Fall semester, as requested)
MUS 646. Survey of Wind Literature (2 hours)
A survey of wind ensemble literature from the Medieval Period to the present. Emphasis will be placed on acquiring a broad knowledge of wind ensemble literature from these periods, gaining a better understanding of musical styles, performance practice unique to each period, wind ensemble development and score study. (Spring Semester, Even Years)
MUS 647. Collaborative Piano Chamber Music Literature I (2 hours)
This course is designed for Collaborative Piano graduate students. This will be an in-depth survey of literature for instruments with piano from the Baroque period through Beethoven and Schubert. Duo sonatas, Trios, Quartets, and Quintets will be discussed.
(Fall semester, odd years)
MUS 648. Collaborative Piano Chamber Music Literature II (2 hours)
Prerequisite: completion MUS 647 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed for Collaborative Piano graduate students. This is a continuation of MUS 647 Collaborative Piano Chamber Music Literature I. This in-depth survey will cover the Romantic era through the 20th century. All standard combinations as well as unusual combinations will be discussed. (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 650. Composition/Arranging (2 hours)
This course will provide a student with the skills needed for original choral and/or instrumental composition in smaller forms. Further, the course will provide arranging techniques for various vocal/instrumental combinations. (Every year, Spring semester)
MUS 651. Graduate Orchestration (2 hours)
Prerequisite: Completion of an undergraduate orchestration class equivalent to MUS 350 or permission of the instructor.
This course involves the study of orchestra and band scores, exercises in orchestrating this type of music for different choirs of instruments, scoring for full orchestra and symphonic band, and performance of class work (original scores, transcriptions or arrangements). (Every year, as requested)
MUS 652. Foundations of Christian Worship (3 hours)
(Cross-listed as PRC 652)
This course will introduce students to the history, theology, and practice of Christian worship. Explorations will be made of the varieties of worship in Israel, in the early church, in the church throughout history, in historic Baptist traditions, and in various modern cultural contexts. Students will learn to think theologically about the character, the content, and the movement of worship in their own context and will learn practical skills for worship leadership. (Spring semester, odd years)
MUS 653. Fundamentals of Theology for Church Musicians (2 hours)
This course is a survey of Christian theology for students preparing for professional music ministry. Building upon key themes in biblical theology, the course gives students an overview of Christian doctrines, with special attention to issues important to church music. The course is designed to expose students to a variety of theological perspectives so that they can develop a coherent theological framework for themselves as well as to engage the religious views of other Christian musicians with integrity and respect. (Fall semester, odd years)
MUS 655a. Graduate Vocal Diction I (1 hour)
Study and application of Italian, Latin (Roman Usage), and English lyric diction through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). (Every year, Fall semester)
MUS 655b. Graduate Vocal Diction II (1 hour)
Study and application of German and Austro-Germanic Latin lyric diction through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 655c. Graduate Vocal Diction III (1 hour)
Study and application of French lyric diction through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). (Spring semester, odd years)
MUS 656. Analytical Techniques I (3 hours)
A survey and application of analytical approaches and techniques in music from tonal works of the late 18th and 19th centuries. Students will acquire an understanding of serial techniques that is sufficient to explain the pitch content and formal procedures in the repertoire of the Second Viennese School. (Every year, Spring semester)
MUS 657. Analytical Techniques II (3 hours)
A survey and application of analytical approaches and techniques for music composed in the 20th and 21st centuries. (Every year, as requested)
MUS 658. Counterpoint in the Style of the 16th Century (3 hours)
A study of compositional techniques that crystallized in the 16th century and reached a peak of development in the music of Palestrina, Lassus, and others. Students will examine polyphonic composition in textures ranging from two to eight voices, plus specialized types of canon and homophonic dance texture. (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 659. Counterpoint in the Style of the 18th Century (3 hours)
A study of tonal counterpoint in a style that crystallized in the first half of the 18th century and reached a peak of development in the music of J. S. Bach. A variety of genres will be explored, including invention, chaconne, chorale prelude, chorale fughetta, figuration variation, and fugue. (Spring semester, odd years)
MUS 660. Organ History & Literature I (2 hours)
A survey of the development of the organ from the genesis of the instrument through the mid-18th century. Literature surveyed will begin with the earliest repertoire from the 14th century through the music of J. S. Bach. Topics to be discussed include: historical design of the organ; performance practice; historical pedagogy, and the development of each national school of organ building and repertoire in Europe. (Fall semester, odd years)
MUS 661. Organ History & Literature II (2 hours)
A continuation of the first semester course: a survey of organ building styles and repertoire beginning with the middle of the 18th century and continuing through the present day. (Spring semester, even years)
MUS 680. Special Topics in Music (Subtitle) (1-3 hours)
A study of some significant topic in music that is not otherwise covered in the School of Music course offerings. The class carries variable course credit (1 to 3 hours) dependent on the proposed course, and may be repeated with a different topic. Courses are created, approved and assigned course credit in the following manner:
 
The professor and student create a proposal for the special topics class using the Special Topics Form located in the music office.
The completed form is submitted to the Director of Graduate Studies.
The Director of Graduate Studies will submit the proposal to the Dean for review. If approved, the Director of Graduate studies will assign the credit hours of the special topics course and create the subtitle of the course. (Every year, Fall and Spring semesters, as requested)
MUS 681. Topics in Church Music Methods (1 hour)
This course provides supplementary instruction and exposure to research in a number of areas on a rotating basis. Topics include music and ethics, critical race theory in worship, congregational research methodology, emerging technology, worship design, and others as identified. Each course earns 1 credit per semester; two semesters of participation are required. (Every semester)
MUS 685. Seminar in the Major (1 hour)
A broad examination of problems related to the major, with intense study of musical literature and interpretation. Specific requirements may differ according to students’ areas of applied study. The MMP degree requires two semesters of enrollment in this seminar resulting in an accumulation of two credit hours. This course may be repeated for credit. (Every year, Fall and Spring semesters)
MUS 701. Spiritual Formation for Ministry I (1 hour)
(Cross-listed as SPF 701)
This course emphasizes the skill of learning to ask the right questions in order to integrate personal, academic, and professional foundations around a center of spiritual maturity. Discussion of these issues will be pursued in a context of personal spiritual disciplines and community-building small groups. (Every semester)
MUS 702. Spiritual Formation for Ministry II (1 hour)
This course focuses on the spiritual disciplines of the inward and the outward journey, with emphasis on aspects particular to Christian ministers and their roles as spiritual guides. The purpose of the course is to help students develop discernment and delight in the experience of the presence of God so that they may form and lead communities in doing and speaking the truth in love, furthering the heritage of Christian spirituality, and increasing in love, trust, and obedience to Christ. (Every semester, as requested)