MaconCatalog : Tift College of Education : COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
NOTE: course requirements may include field experience.
 
Educational Leadership (EDEL)
EDEL 601. Introduction to Higher Education (3 hours)
This course is designed as an introduction to the historical development of higher education from early colonial times to the present. Students will identify and explore global and domestic events that have impacted and have been impacted by the development of higher education in the United States and in other parts of the world. In addition, the course focuses on globally significant as well as unique aspects of US higher education, including electives, extra-curricular activities, and intercollegiate athletics. (Twice a year)
EDEL 602. Student Affairs (3 hours)
This course is designed as a comprehensive and in-depth exploration of the psycho-social development of today’s college student. Students will learn about various student development theories and how those theories apply to contemporary college students, both traditional and non-traditional. In addition, the course focuses on factors that influence today’s college student’s choice of career, political interests, and values and ethics. (Once a year)
EDEL 604. Leadership Theory (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth analysis of various leadership theories. Significant attention is devoted to students learning their own leadership styles and understanding how those styles potentially impact organizational effectiveness. Students will learn how to apply various theories to real-world situations. (Once a year)
EDEL 605. Leadership in Curriculum and Supervision (3 hours)
This course provides a study of how philosophical underpinnings impact the design, construction, evaluation and revision of curriculum. Special attention is given to the instructional leader's role in the continuing process of curriculum development, selection, and evaluation. (Once a year)
EDEL 606. Foundations of Academic Advising (3 hours)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the various models of academic advising in higher education. In addition, students will learn about the history and foundation of academic advising and its role in assisting students in the matriculation process.
EDEL 607. Higher Education Organization and Governance (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide students an overview of the various models of organization and governance in higher education. The role of the chief executive and his/her relationship with Trustees will be examined. In addition, the various structures and configurations of Boards of Trustees will be examined. The role of faculty in campus governance will be explored. Also, the centrality of academics in the mission of a college or university is examined. (Twice a year)
EDEL 609. Internship (3 hours)
This course allows students to engage in meaningful field experiences that directly relate to their career interests. Students will select an internship site that provides opportunities to expand their depth and breadth of knowledge and experience in their chosen concentration. A total of 150 contact hours is required for successful completion of internship. Special fee. (Twice a year)
EDEL 610. Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment (3 hours)
This course presents a comprehensive overview of the role, scope, and purposes of institutional effectiveness. The course explores the major functions of institutional effectiveness, including assessment, research, planning and budgeting, and accreditation and how they all relate to each other. (Once a year)
EDEL 611. Legal Issues in Higher Education (3 hours)
This course presents an overview of court cases and legal issues that impact governance and leadership in higher education. The course covers legal issues related to student conduct, faculty rights, and institution-student relationships. (Once a year)
EDEL 614. Leadership in Intercollegiate Athletics (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth understanding of the role of intercollegiate athletics, including its historical development and its contemporary impact on modern colleges and universities. A major emphasis of the course is to provide students the opportunity to become knowledgeable of how athletic departments operate, including administrative structure, recruitment of student athletes, NCAA compliance, Title IX compliance and resource development and distribution. (Once a year)
EDEL 615. Leadership in Today's Schools (3 hours)
This course is a study of current organizational and leadership theories in education and an examination of professional competencies needed in leadership positions with application to actual school situations. (Twice a year)
EDEL 616. Finance in Higher Education (3 hours)
This course examines the methods and procedures for generating and allocating financial resources in 4-year colleges and universities. Specific attention will be devoted to how private and public institutions generate income and the rules for allocating those resources. In addition, students will learn how to create a budget utilizing the various elements of a revenue and expenditure budget. (Once a year)
EDEL 618. Cultural Perspectives in Higher Ed Leadership (3 hours)
This course offers an overview of the foundations of cultural perspectives in higher education leadership as a means for improving students’ cultural competence. The course is designed for students to explore the various cultural dimensions of leadership in higher education, including issues related to race, culture, gender, age, disability, and sexual orientation. Students will be introduced to various theories and models that explain differences and similarities among various groups of students.
EDEL 621. Foundations of Independent Schools (3 hours)
This course provides a study of the history and various philosophical foundations of independent schools. Students will learn about the various models of independent schools, their funding sources, their goals, and their impact on students and society. (Once a year)
EDEL 622. Managing Resources in Independent and Charter Schools (3 hours)
This course provides a general introduction to and overview of the financial management practices and problems of independent and charter schools. Specific topics will include financial accounting; budgeting/resource allocation; cost containment and retrenchment; tuition revenues; endowments; investments; grants and strategy development/strategic planning. In addition, issues related to real estate acquisition/management and acquisition and management of tangible assets will be explored. (Once a year)
EDEL 623. Leadership of the Extra-Curricular Program in Independent Schools (3 hours)
This course is designed to inform candidates about the various extra-curricular activities that take place in independent schools, with a focus on management of resources related to those activities and effective processes for managing them. Topics will include regulatory compliance for competitive activities, staffing, financial management, supervision, etc. (Once a year)
EDEL 624. Legal and Ethical Requirements of Independent Schools (3 hours)
This course provides the candidates with an overview of the legal system as it relates to independent schools. Candidates will study applicable statutory and case law in order to gain a practical understanding of legal principles. Further, candidates will explore ethical systems and consider their application to independent schools. (Once a year)
EDEL 625. Managing the School Environment (3 hours)
This course is a study of school business management and finance designed to provide the educational leader with basic principles of school management, accounting and purchasing procedures, school finance and information systems. Emphasis will be placed on equipping educational leaders with a foundation of leadership principles designed to enhance personnel management skills. (Twice a year)
EDEL 635. Assessment & Evaluation in Today's Schools (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of assessment practices for improvement of student learning. A major focus will be placed on analysis of various assessment measures available to improve the teaching and learning process. (Twice a year)
EDEL 637. Leadership Clinical Internship I (3 hours)
Principal Clinical Internship I (PCI I) is the first of a two-course sequence that provides significant opportunities for students to engage in reflective practice as a building administrator and educational leader. The PCI I is planned, guided, and evaluated cooperatively by the student, the university professor, and the field site mentor who is a licensed, practicing building administrator/educational leader. Students are expected to (1) become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of the principal; (2) lead the planning, implementation, evaluation, and reporting of a project designed to improve education in a school; and (3) reflect upon her/his leadership, seeking meaningful improvement as an educational leader. During PCI I, students engage in discussions with members of their cohort, keep a reflective journal, and record hours spent on their project. The professor will plan periodic conference calls, and/or personal phone calls, and/or visits with the student and his/her mentor to help guide the project and provide additional course oversight. The PCI I course covers the initial planning and placement in the project experience and continues with initial implementation of the project. (Once a year)
EDEL 638. Leadership Clinical Internship II (3 hours)
Principal Clinical Internship II (PCI II) is the second of a two-course sequence that provides significant opportunities for students to engage in reflective practice as a building administrator and educational leader. The PCI is planned, guided, and evaluated cooperatively by the student, the university professor, and the field site mentor who is a licensed, practicing building administrator/educational leader. Students are expected to (1) become familiar with the roles and responsibilities of the principal; (2) lead the planning, implementation, evaluation, and reporting of a project designed to improve education in a school; and (3) reflect upon her/his leadership, seeking meaningful improvement as an educational leader. During PCI II, students engage in discussions with members of their cohort, keep a reflective journal, and record hours spent on their project. The professor will plan periodic conference calls, and/or personal phone calls, and/or visits with the student and his/her mentor to help guide the project and provide additional course oversight. The PCI II course begins as a continuation of PCI I, the implementation of the project, and ends with collaborative evaluation and a written project report. (Once a year)
EDEL 645A. Internship I (3 hours)
This course provides a supervised administrative/supervisory field experience in a placement appropriate to career objectives and approved by the faculty advisor (requires 80 clock hours). Includes seminars for debriefing and reflection. Special fee.
EDEL 645B. Internship II (3 hours for 2 consecutive semesters for a total of 6 hours)
Prerequisite: only those candidates admitted into Performance-Based Educational Leadership programs may register.
Internship II runs for one year; the first 3 hours are to be completed during fall semester and the remaining 3 hours during spring semester. This course provides a supervised administrative/supervisory field experience in a placement appropriate to career objectives and approved by the faculty advisor. This year-long internship sequence includes seminars for debriefing and reflection. Candidates enrolled in the performance-based leadership track must complete this year-long intensive internship experience at either the building and/or system level. Special Fee.
EDEL 646. Performance-based Internship I (Building-level) (3 hours)
This is the first semester of a required two-semester sequence necessary for the candidate to apply for performance-based certification through the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Only those candidates admitted into Performance-Based Educational Leadership programs may register. At the start of the course, candidates will work with their school system assigned mentor and the Mercer coordinator to develop a yearlong plan of experiences that are consistent with demonstrating mastery of ISLLC standards for school, leadership. Students enrolled in this course will develop experiences that are consistent with a building-level leader. Special fee. (Twice a year)
EDEL 647. Performance-based Internship II (Building-level) (3 hours)
This is the second semester of a required two-semester sequence necessary for the candidate to apply for performance-based certification through the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Only those candidates admitted into Performance-Based Educational Leadership programs may register. At the start of the course, candidates will work with their school system assigned mentor and the Mercer coordinator to develop a year-long plan of experiences that are consistent with demonstrating mastery of ISLLC standards for school, leadership. Students enrolled in this course will develop experiences that are consistent with a building-level leader. Special fee. (Twice a year)
EDEL 648. Performance-based Internship I (System-level) (3 hours)
This is the first semester of a required two-semester sequence necessary for the candidate to apply for performance-based certification through the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Only those candidates admitted into Performance-Based Educational Leadership programs may register. At the start of the course, candidates will work with their school system assigned mentor and the Mercer coordinator to develop a yearlong plan of experiences that are consistent with demonstrating mastery of ISLLC standards for school, leadership. Students enrolled in this course will develop experiences that are consistent with a system-level leader. Special fee. (Twice a year)
EDEL 649. Performance-based Internship II (System-level) (3 hours)
This the second semester of a required two-semester sequence necessary for the candidate to apply for performance-based certification through the Georgia Professional Standards Commission. Only those candidates admitted into Performance-Based Educational Leadership programs may register. At the start of the course, candidates will work with their school system assigned mentor and the Mercer coordinator to develop a yearlong plan of experiences that are consistent with demonstrating mastery of ISLLC standards for school, leadership. Students enrolled in this course will develop experiences that are consistent with a system-level leader. Special fee. (Twice a year)
EDEL 655. School Law and Ethics (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of relevant school law topics. The legal aspects of teaching and the rights, responsibilities, and ethics of professional service will be emphasized. Laws and standards that directly impact the work of teachers and school administrators will be examined. (Twice a year)
EDEL 665. Leadership in Instructional Supervision (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth study of leadership strategies for instructional supervision and improvement. Principles of human development theory along with research based adult learning and motivational theories will be applied. Special topics will include the development of comprehensive professional growth plans and the application of best practices for student learning. (Twice a year)
EDEL 685. Technology for School Leaders (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide educational leaders with the knowledge to develop practical approaches to planning, organizing, and directing the integration of technology into the school curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on the use of technology both for administrative and curricular purposes. (Once a year)
EDEL 695. Educational Research (3 hours)
The purpose of this course is to examine research methodology and applied research. Emphasis will be given to the review and evaluation of educational research. Each student will be required to design and write a research project. (Once a year)
EDEL 699. Special Topics in Educational Leadership (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director
A study of specific topics that meet the needs of master’s students in educational leadership. (Can be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours by permission of program director.) (Occasionally)
EDEL 701. Special Topics in Educational Leadership (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: Program Chair approval.
This course is a study of specific topics that meet the needs of non-doctoral students in educational leadership. This course is usually done as a directed individual study that will include special projects. (Occasionally)
EDEL 703. The Principalship (3 hours)
This course is designed for those candidates preparing for a career in building-level school leadership. This course is a general introduction to the principalship and contains material that is both theoretical and practical in nature. Candidates receive direction in developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes that foster instructional leadership within the school. The concepts of instructional leadership, management, human relations, and personnel development are detailed and internship assignments are integrated into course requirements. (Once a year)
EDEL 704. The Superintendency (3 hours)
This course examines the role and responsibilities of the school superintendent as chief executive officer of a complex organization. The course focuses on the leadership roles of the superintendent and central office personnel in working with the board of education, building principals, school staff members, citizens of the community and political and educational leaders. Attention is given to the role of the system-level leaders in instruction and curriculum, personnel administration, finance and business management, and buildings and grounds. Internship experiences are integrated in course requirements. (Once a year)
EDEL 705. School Leadership Preservice I (3 hours)
The course provides an introduction to topics most relevant to aspiring P-12 school leaders including the use and analysis of teaching and learning data to lead school improvement and theories of organizational leadership. Additionally, candidates will be introduced to various leadership styles, and learn to explore and identify their own.
EDEL 706. School Leadership Preservice II (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of legal principles relevant to educators, with a focus on practical application of those principles by school administrators. Class sessions will include discussion of current law and ethics related topics in schools, practical application exercises, and a study of relevant court cases and Georgia State Board of Education decisions on matters of school law.
EDEL 707. Cognition and Learning in Curriculum and Instruction (3 hours)
This course is an analysis of curriculum and instructional models/theories, classroom/system applications, current issues/trends and their impact on educational leadership practices. (Once a year)
EDEL 708. Effective Human Resources Practices (3 hours)
This course provides an overview of the statutes that regulate human resources practices. The focus will be on the employment process to include job descriptions, advertising, recruiting, interviewing, selection, hiring, orientation, mentoring and retention of quality employees. In addition, compensation studies, salary schedules and benefit packages will be reviewed. A thorough knowledge of the evaluation process to include professional development plans and due process, as required by law, will be presented. (Once a year)
EDEL 709. School Finance and Budgeting (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth study of school district finance and budgeting. The focus will include funding formulas, state allotment sheets, millage rates, bond issues and special taxes as they relate to school systems. The emphasis will be on creating a school district annual budget that supports the system's mission and goals. (Once a year)
EDEL 710. Facilitating Professional Learning and Development (3 hours)
Candidates will analyze and apply techniques used in leading professional development for the improvement of instruction. Emphasis will be given to needs assessments, focus groups, ongoing support, formative and summative evaluation, and budgeting. (Once a year)
EDEL 721. Foundations of Leadership (3 hours)
This course explores the phenomenon of leadership from a research as well as theoretical perspective focusing upon critical education outcome elements and the process elements which contribute to organizational effectiveness. (Once a year)
EDEL 722. School, Community, & Society (3 hours)
This course is designed to examine current key issues in today's schools. Special emphasis will be given to developing school leaders who are community collaborators, net-workers, and problem solvers. (Twice a year)
EDEL 723. Strategies for Improving Low Performing Schools (3 hours)
This course will develop the competencies for leading and managing change and utilizing data for planning and school improvement as well as experiences in operationalizing these competencies. The outcomes will be accomplished through the examination of change theory as well as institutions engaged in successful change practices, the study of data-based decision-making and planning, and the application of skills for organizational renewal. Completion of this course will result in developing school leaders that have the competencies to successfully lead in an environment of change and turnaround low performing schools. (Once a year)
EDEL 724. Performance-based Clinical Practice Internship I (3 hours)
Prerequisite: Only those candidates admitted into Performance-Based Educational Leadership programs may register.
Performance-based Internship I is taken during the Fall semester. This course provides a supervised administrative/supervisory field experience in a placement appropriate to career objectives and approved by the faculty advisor. This first semester of a year-long internship sequence includes seminars for leadership performance tasks design and plan, problem-solving skills, plan implementation, debriefing and reflection. Candidates enrolled in the performance-based leadership track must complete this semester clinical practice experience prior to enrolling in Tier II Performance-based Clinical Practice Internship II.
EDEL 725. Performance-based Clinical Practice Internship II (3 hours)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of EDEL 724 Performance-based Internship I.
Performance-based Internship II is taken during the Spring semester. This course provides a supervised administrative/supervisory clinical practice/extended residency experience in a placement appropriate to career objectives and approved by the faculty advisor. This second semester of a year-long internship sequence includes seminars for debriefing, analyzing leadership tasks performances and reflection. Candidates enrolled in the performance-based leadership track must complete this semester clinical practice experience in order to be eligible for Tier II Performance-based Leadership certification.
EDEL 764. Crisis Preparedness for School and Academic Leaders: Preemption, Negotiation, and Recovery (3 hours)
The course prepares P-12 and higher education leaders with the knowledge, tools, and resources necessary to anticipate mitigate, and recover from natural and human instigated crises. Included in the course is a final symposium consisting of an interactive panel presentation featuring representatives from national, state, and local crisis preparedness agencies selected by the instructor. (Occasionally)
 
Education (EDUC)
EDUC 618. Issues of Diversity: Language, Cognition, and Culture (3 hours)
This course provides the basis for understanding diversity by exploring the social, cognitive, and communicative roots of diversity: with a primary focus on how students learn to think and communicate within their home, community, and school environments. (Summer)
EDUC 625. Culturally and Educationally Responsive Pedagogy (3 hours)
This course provides students with the theory, knowledge, and strategies to teach the culturally diverse and special needs population in today’s classrooms. This course goes beyond the usual rhetoric on promoting diversity to present real-world guidance and recommendations for successful teaching in the changing classroom environment. (Summer)
EDUC 699. Special Topics in Education (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: consent of advisor.
A study of specific topics in education which meet the needs of graduate students. (Can be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours with consent of advisor.) (Occasionally)
 
Master of Arts in Teaching (EMAT)
EMAT 601. Initial Field Experience (1 hour)
Prerequisites: See Teacher Education Field Experience section.
This semester-long course provides teacher candidates a community or school-based placement early in the teacher preparation program during which they are expected to observe the learning and teaching environment, tutor individual students or small groups of students, and reflect on teaching experiences in this setting. Candidates are required to complete a semester-long experience, including at least 35 hours in their assigned placement, under the direction of a certified classroom instructor (or the equivalent, for community placements). Additionally, candidates must attend Initial Field Experience Orientation and all related seminars. Application required. Special fee. (Fall and Spring; Summer by special arrangement)
EMAT 608. Practicum (3 hours)
Prerequisites: See Teacher Education Field Experience section.
This course should be taken the semester prior to Student Teaching or Internship. This course provides a school-based teaching experience for teacher candidates. Candidates will be assigned a placement based on required cluster and diversity requirements, and will spend a minimum of 60-80 hours in the classroom over a semester. See course syllabus for weekly schedule. Candidates are required to attend all Practicum Orientation and seminars. Application required. Special fee. (Fall and Spring)
EMAT 609. Mentored Practicum (3 hours)
Prerequisites: See Teacher Education Field Experience section. Also contact the Office of Field Placement for additional paperwork required.
The Mentored Practicum is designed for those candidates who are employed in an approved accredited school setting on a non-renewable teaching certificate, and in a set- ting appropriate to the certification that the candidate is seeking. The candidate will complete this course in his or her own classroom, under the mentorship of a teacher assigned by the school and by a Mercer supervisor. Additional clock hours in other school settings may be assigned in order for the candidate to meet diversity requirements for certification. Candidates are required to attend seminars, including orientation. Application required. Mentored Practicum application also required. Special fee. (Fall and Spring)
EMAT 610A. Refining Teaching and Learning Performance (1 hour)
Prerequisites: application required; full admission status; consent of site chair.
This graduate-level course provides a field-based experience for students who wish to refine their teaching skills, modify a single edTPA task, and resubmit the edTPA portfolio in order to complete the requirements for recommendation for full teacher certification. The course is evaluated on a Satisfactory (s) or Unsatisfactory (U) basis. A special fee will be assessed. (Every year in at least one location)
EMAT 610B. Refining Teaching and Learning Performance (3 hours)
Prerequisites: application required; full admission status; consent of site chair.
This graduate-level course provides a field-based experience for students who wish to refine their teaching skills, modify multiple edTPA tasks, and resubmit the edTPA portfolio in order to complete the requirements for recommendation for full teacher certification. The course is evaluated on a Satisfactory (s) or Unsatisfactory (U) basis. A special fee will be assessed. (Every year in at least one location)
EMAT 611. Student Teaching (9 hours)
Prerequisites: See Teacher Education Field Experience section.
This course provides a full-day semester long teaching experience for teacher candidates. Candidates will be assigned to diverse public schools and will gradually assume responsibility for working with groups and individuals. Student Teachers will participate in classroom teaching and observation, planning and evaluation conferences, and other school related experiences with guidance provided by the Classroom Teacher and University Supervisor. Each Student Teacher will teach full-time for a minimum of three to five weeks. Candidates are required to attend all student teaching orientation and seminars. Application required. Special fee. (Fall and Spring)
EMAT 612. Internship (9 hours)
Prerequisites: See Teacher Education Field Experience section. Also contact the Office of Field Placement for additional paperwork required.
The Internship is designed for candidates who are employed in an accredited and approved public or private school setting and are teaching on a non-renewable teaching certificate in an appropriate setting for which the candidate is seeking clear renewable status. Candidates are required to attend all internship orientation and seminars. Specific policies and requirements are included in the Teacher Education Handbook. Application required. Internship application also required. Special fee. (Fall and Spring)
EMAT 617. Foundations of Education and History of STEM Education (3 hours)
This course introduces students to teaching as a profession and how STEM education has developed within the broader profession. Topics include teaching as a profession, the organization and culture of schools, legal rights and responsibilities of teachers and students, philosophical and psychological perspectives, historical developments underlying education in the United States, social issues in education, the application of learning theory to instruction and learning environments, basic concepts and principles regarding teaching strategies, assessment and evaluation of student learning, and teaching from a multicultural perspective. All of these topics are discussed with an emphasis on the infusion of STEM education within these topics. (Summer I)
EMAT 620. Adolescent Development & Learning (3 hours)
The objective of this course is to integrate critical aspects of adolescent development and learning, and related learning theory. The course addresses adolescent cognitive development, social/emotional development, learning theories, classroom management, and discipline theories. Specific obstacles to learning and treatment approaches are also presented. Implications for students with exceptional and diverse backgrounds are discussed throughout the course. (Summer)
EMAT 624. Curriculum, Instruction, & Planning for Secondary (3 hours)
This course is designed to help the beginning teacher candidate prepare to teach in a 6-12 setting. This course includes an orientation to curriculum studies as an area of research that affects middle and secondary schools. Candidates will learn and implement methods of curriculum design, assessment, units, lesson plans, and instructional strategies to meet the diverse needs of students in grades 6-12. (Summer)
EMAT 642. Content Area Reading & Writing: Literacy Development for MGE/SEC (3 hours)
This course will focus on the development, use, and evaluation of language, concepts (specialized vocabulary), and critical thinking while reading text and writing to enhance learning. Attention will be given to the use of metacognitive strategies, including visual tools, so that all students can become engaged and active literacy learners. (Fall)
EMAT 645. Teaching English (3 hours)
This course focuses on a study of how to teach English in secondary schools. Its perspective is student-centered, constructivist, developmental, inquiry based, and reflective. The course includes investigation of crucial issues such as: constructivist principles of learning, approaches to teaching grammar and writing, approaches to teaching literature, portfolios, censorship. Attention will be given to means of assessments, including authentic assessment and to state and national standards for the English/Language Arts guide for improved pedagogy. (Fall)
EMAT 666. Teaching Mathematics in MGE & SEC (3 hours)
This course provides an in-depth concentration on selected topics that are included in the middle and secondary curricula. Included are reflective thinking as related to the mathematics classroom; application and problem solving; error pattern diagnosis; pre-algebra; algebra; geometry; data collection, interpretation, and analysis; technology; evaluation alignment and techniques; and related NCTM Standards. Attention is given to enabling all students, including those who are exceptional, disabled, and culturally diverse, to become active learners of mathematics. (Fall)
EMAT 672. Teaching Science in MGE & SEC (3 hours)
This course is designed to provide science content knowledge appropriate for middle and secondary education (grades 4-8 and 6-12). There will be an in-depth investigation of concepts of science, current science programs, instructional methods and technology and evaluation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on preparing teachers to incorporate appropriate science content, process skills, attitudes, and real-world applications into the science classroom. Effective ways to teach and assess students, including those with exceptionalities, disabilities, and cultural diversities, using the National Science Standards will be modeled. (Fall)
EMAT 676. Adolescent Development & Learning in Context (3 hours)
The objective of this course is to integrate adolescent development with related learning theories to understand the (1) developmental progression of the adolescent (cognitively, socially, emotionally, and developmentally) and (2) appropriate strategies to engage the adolescent learner while being cognoscente of the unique needs of the adolescent learner. Specific pedagogical strategies address knowledge of adolescent development and how to use that knowledge to develop positive student interactions and learning environment. This course provides teacher candidates with the appropriate academic language related to adolescent health and development and a working knowledge of seminal works and experts in the field of adolescent development. Teacher candidates will operationalize concepts from the course in middle level STEM clinical setting. (Summer I)
EMAT 677. STEM Methods I in Context: Engineering Design Process (2 hours)
This laboratory course provides students with an introduction to the engineering design process. The laboratory course content may include topics such as electronics and microcontrollers, fabrication, and project-based exercises, such as a structure design project and/or a competition design project. Within the context of engineering design, cross-disciplinary connections between the STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) will be made explicit as well as emphasis on appropriate STEM reasoning modalities including critical thinking, model-based reasoning, quantitative reasoning and data supported decisions. Teacher candidates will operationalize concepts from the course in a middle level clinical setting. Because of its “In Context” designation, this course provides a middle level clinical experience for STEM MAT candidates. Students will work in a setting with a diverse group of public school students from surrounding counties and will spend a minimum of thirty-five clock hours over a semester with them in an observing, participating, and teaching capacity in STEM-related activities. Students enrolled in EMAT 676 / EMAT 677 will be under the direct supervision of a certified high school classroom teacher and university supervisor. (Summer I)
EMAT 678. Curriculum, Instruction, and Planning in Context for SEC (3 hours)
This course is an orientation to curriculum studies (6-12) that affects middle and secondary students. Candidates will learn and implement methods of integrated/interdisciplinary curriculum design, assessment, units, lesson plans, and instructional strategies to scaffold student learning and meet the diverse needs of students in grades 6-12. In addition to weekly course meetings, teacher candidates will implement assignments from the course in a school-based clinical experience. Because of its “In Context” designation, this course provides a high school clinical experience for STEM MAT candidates. In this course, candidates will begin a year-long placement in a high needs rural or urban public school setting with a certified secondary math or science teacher. Candidates will spend a minimum of 500 clock hours over the semester observing, participating, and teaching. Students enrolled in EMAT 678, EMAT 679, and either EMAT 684 or EMAT 685 will be under the direct supervision of a certified classroom teacher and university supervisor. (Fall)
EMAT 679. Educational Assessment in Context (3 hours)
This course provides an introduction to educational assessment. It is designed to aid students in the acquisition of skills and knowledge required to create, administer, and evaluate assessments and become a competent consumer of educational research while situated in a clinical setting. Because of its “In Context” designation, this course provides a high school clinical experience for STEM MAT candidates. In this course, candidates will begin a year-long placement in a high needs rural or urban public school setting with a certified secondary math or science teacher. Candidates will spend a minimum of 500 clock hours over the semester observing, participating, and teaching. Students enrolled in EMAT 678, EMAT 679, and either EMAT 684 or EMAT 685 will be under the direct supervision of a certified classroom teacher and university supervisor. (Fall)
EMAT 680. STEM Methods II: Model-based Reasoning (2 hours)
This course provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to STEM from a model-based reasoning perspective. Students will develop and use STEM reasoning modalities including model-based, quantitative, computational based reasoning in the context of mathematical laboratory experiences to build models and equations that connect abstract mathematics concepts to real world concepts in STEM and STEM related disciplines. Students will develop and use pedagogical approaches such as problem-based and project-based to extend mathematical concepts across STEM and STEM related disciplines. Teacher candidates will operationalize concepts from the course in a school-based clinical experience in addition to coursework, which may include field trips to STEM-related destinations. (Spring)
EMAT 682. Teaching Social Studies in MGE & SEC (3 hours)
This course provides a broad understanding of the teaching of the social sciences coinciding with awareness, understanding, and respect for cultural diversity in American society. Specifically, the course is designed (1) (To Know) to provide social studies content knowledge appropriate for middle and secondary education; (2) (To Do) model developmentally appropriate teaching methods as recommended by the National Council for the Social Studies, and (3) (To Be) explore the implications of social studies educational attitudes and values within our multicultural society. (Fall)
EMAT 683. Teaching Exceptional Learners (3 hours)
This course explores the fundamentals of Exceptional Learner Education in America’s schools. Emphasis is given to the historical development of Exceptional Learner Education, relevant legislation and litigation, educational policy, and contemporary trends and issues. In addition to providing an overview of the various exceptionalities, attention is given to typical physical, social, cognitive, and learning characteristics of students, including at risk and other diverse learners. Students will also be exposed to teaching strategies to improve student achievement and engagement, including research-based interventions. Emphasis is given to empowering the transforming educator to recognize her/his role in embracing all children as part of a community of learners. This course includes and goes well beyond the minimum special education requirement for Georgia certification. (Summer I)
EMAT 684. Methods for Teaching Math in Context for Secondary (4 hours)
This course provides an in-depth concentration on selected mathematics topics that are included in the middle and secondary education. Included are reflective thinking as related to the mathematics classroom; application and problem solving; error pattern diagnosis; pre-algebra and algebra; geometry; data collection, interpretation, and analysis; technology; evaluation alignment and techniques, and relative NCTM Standards. Focus is given to the integration of mathematics within science, technology and engineering in the teaching/learning process. Attention is given to enabling all students to become active learners of mathematics and making abstract mathematical concepts relevant not only across STEM disciplines but within the context of real world application. In addition to weekly course meetings, teacher candidates will operationalize concepts from the course in a school-based clinical experience. Because of its “In Context” designation, this course provides a high school clinical experience for STEM MAT candidates. In this course, candidates will begin a year-long placement in a high needs rural or urban public school setting with a certified secondary math or science teacher. Candidates will spend a minimum of 500 clock hours over the semester observing, participating, and teaching. Students enrolled in EMAT 678, EMAT 679, and either EMAT 684 or EMAT 685 will be under the direct supervision of a certified classroom teacher and university supervisor. Special fee. (Fall)
EMAT 685. Methods for Teaching Science in Context for Secondary (4 hours)
This course is designed to provide science content knowledge and pedagogical practices appropriate for middle and secondary education. There will be an in-depth investigation of scientific concepts across STEM disciplines, emphasis on the use of technology applications to enhance data collection, analysis, and evaluation. Emphasis will be placed on: (1) preparing teachers to incorporate appropriate science content in STEM, process skills, habits of mind, pedagogical strategies through authentic real-world application and experiences, (2) effective ways to teach and assess students, including those with exceptionalities, disabilities, and cultural diversities, and (3) state level science standards. Teacher candidates will operationalize concepts from the course in a clinical experience in a partner district in addition to weekly course meetings. Because of its “In Context” designation, this course provides a high school clinical experience for STEM MAT candidates. In this course, candidates will begin a year-long placement in a high needs rural or urban public school setting with a certified secondary math or science teacher. Candidates will spend a minimum of 500 clock hours over the semester observing, participating, and teaching. Students enrolled in EMAT 678, EMAT 679 and either EMAT 684 or EMAT 685 will be under the direct supervision of a certified classroom teacher and university supervisor. Special fee. (Fall)
EMAT 686. STEM Methods III in Context for Secondary (6 hours)
This STEM methods course will use concepts learned in prior STEM methods and content methods courses to develop research-based interdisciplinary activities that foster critical thinking and reasoning skills and that employ age appropriate pedagogical practices for the secondary level. This course focuses on designing and implementing interdisciplinary STEM experiences in a clinical setting with an emphasis on collaboration, systems-thinking, web-based sources and applications, and career awareness in STEM. Attention will be given to practical issues that face the secondary STEM teachers in the field such as student motivation; limited resources, time, space; and other barriers to implementing cross-disciplinary STEM instruction. Teacher candidates will operationalize concepts from the course in a school-based clinical experience and will include connections to STEM-related careers. Because of its “In Context” designation, this course provides a high school clinical experience for STEM MAT candidates. In this course, candidates will continue a year-long placement in a high needs rural or urban public school setting with a certified secondary math or science teacher. Candidates will spend a minimum of 500 clock hours over the semester observing, participating, and teaching. Students enrolled in EMAT 686 will be under the direct supervision of a certified classroom teacher and university supervisor. Special fee. (Spring)
EMAT 687. Disciplinary Literacy for Secondary STEM Fields (2 hours)
Adolescent literacy and disciplinary literacy will be explored in relation to the specialized literacy skills in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Emphasis will be placed on the skills students need to navigate complex texts, to enhance critical thinking and to learn disciplinary discourses related to STEM fields. Connections to real world careers will be used to mentor students into the language of STEM fields. Attention will be given to sociocultural context of students to promote active and engaged literacy learning. (Fall)
EMAT 688. Capstone in STEM Teaching and Learning (5 hours)
In this course the teacher candidate will develop an individualized professional development plan, which addresses all of the following: (1) potential barriers to success, (2) creation and submission of grant, conference, and/or publication proposal, (3) identify and develop a network of business, industry, university, and/or community partners, and (4) engage in service learning connected to your research and teaching. Course requirements will include community service at a designated site. (Summer II)
EMAT 689. Educational Assessment and Research (3 hours)
This course provides an introduction to educational assessment and research. It is designed to aid students in the acquisition of skills and knowledge required to create, administer, and evaluate assessments and become a competent consumer of education- al research. The focus will be on preparation to implement educational assessment skills and action research in a field setting. Appropriate emphasis will be placed on the relevance of technological development in this area. (Summer)
EMAT 699. Special Topics in Education (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: consent of advisor.
A study of specific topics in education which meet the needs of graduate students. (Can be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours with consent of advisor.) (Occasionally)