MaconCatalog : The School of Engineering : Degree Programs : Environmental Engineering (M.S.E.) and Environmental Systems (M.S.)
 
Environmental Engineering (M.S.E.) and Environmental Systems (M.S.)
The Master of Science in Engineering in Environmental Engineering and the Master of Science in Environmental Systems programs are characterized by the breadth of subject areas that comprise the disciplines. The programs are designed to prepare students to appreciate and apply an appropriate depth of knowledge in traditional environmental engineering and science subject areas such as water, wastewater, air pollution and solid waste. In addition, the programs are focused on sustainability and green engineering as well as relevant global environmental issues such as hazardous waste site reclamation, greenhouse gas emissions abatement and sequestration, emergent contaminants and natural treatment systems.
The Master of Science in Engineering in Environmental Engineering curriculum requires that a total of 30 semester hours of graduate coursework be completed. The program can be arranged with either a thesis or an all coursework option. A minimum of 18 hours must be taken in the Environmental Engineering discipline, 12 of which must be at the 600 level. The additional 12 hours required for graduation should be taken from the Engineering/Technical Management master’s degree program offered within the School of Engineering. Students must also complete a minimum of 18 hours at the 600 level. An optional thesis is also available. A maximum of 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree if the thesis option is chosen. The program is open to all qualified engineers, regardless of undergraduate engineering major. Students who do not have an adequate background (CHM 111 or CHM 112) in chemistry may be required to take additional courses.
The Master of Science in Environmental Systems degree requires that a total of 30 semester hours of graduate coursework be completed. The program can be arranged with a thesis or an all coursework option. A minimum of 18 hours must be taken in the Environmental Engineering discipline, 12 of which must be taken at the 600 level. The additional 12 hours required for graduation should be taken from Engineering/Technical Management master’s degree program offered within the School of Engineering. Students must also complete a minimum of 18 hours at the 600 level. An optional thesis is also available. A maximum of 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree if the thesis option is chosen. Only grades of satisfactory or unsatisfactory will be assigned. Students who do not have adequate backgrounds in mathematics (MAT 191, MAT 192, and MAT 330) or chemistry (CHM 111 and CHM 112) may be required to take additional courses.
Graduate Concentration in Engineering for Development (E4D)
The Engineering for Development (E4D) graduate concentration prepares students for careers as engineering professionals in the humanitarian and development sectors, and has an international focus that includes Master’s thesis field research carried out in a developing community. The focus of the E4D program is sustainable solutions for people and the environment, with an emphasis on improving the lives of under-served populations, both locally and internationally. All engineering courses offered by this program focus on appropriate, sustainable solutions.
 
Graduate Concentration Requirements
EVE 511. Environmental Engineering for Development
3 hours
EVE 512. Green Engineering
3 hours
EVE 611. Research Methods in Engineering for Development
3 hours
E4D-related Master’s Thesis
 
 
EVE Courses
EVE 502. Air Pollution Generation and Control (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EVE 290 (or consent of instructor).
Fundamental concepts including the origin and fate of air pollutants. Basic concepts of atmospheric chemistry and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion phenomena, governmental regulations, emission and air-quality standards. Design of processes and equipment for control of gaseous and particulate emissions. Current issues. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every two years)
EVE 503. Atmospheric Chemistry I (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EVE 402 or EVE 502.
An introduction to atmospheric chemical transformations; atomic structure and chemical bonding; thermodynamics, gas-phase kinetics, and photochemistry; tropospheric processes; stratospheric processes. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every two years)
EVE 505. Design and Analysis of Wastewater Systems (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EVE 290.
Analysis and design of wastewater treatment systems beginning with an overview of the sources of water pollution and discussion of wastewater characteristics. Fundamental theory and design of conventional wastewater treatment facilities is presented followed by the principles used to design advanced wastewater treatment facilities. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every two years)
EVE 506. Design and Analysis of Water Systems (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EVE 290.
Analysis and design of water treatment systems beginning with an overview of the sources of water and discussion of water quality parameters. Fundamental theory and design of conventional water treatment facilities is presented followed by the principles used to design advanced water treatment facilities. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every year)
EVE 507. Modeling and Simulation of Wastewater Processes (3 hours)
Prerequisites: EVE 290 and graduate standing.
The International Water Association’s approach to modeling and simulation of wastewater treatment plant design and operation is presented. Fundamental microbial metabolism theory and wastewater characterization will be covered. This will be followed by the theory and modeling of organic removal, nitrogen removal, and phosphorus removal treatment schemes. Students will use stoichiometric and kinetic equations to model these systems from a steady-state perspective and then use the BioWin software for modeling these systems from both a steady-state and dynamic state of operation. (Occasionally)
EVE 510. Process Chemistry (3 hours)
Prerequisites: EVE 290 and graduate standing.
A study of aqueous processes occurring in natural waters and in water and wastewater treatment systems. It is also intended to give a comprehensive knowledge of the factors that affect theses processes. Topic include chemical thermodynamics and equilibrium, kinetics, acid-base chemistry, the carbonate system, precipitation and dissolution, complexation, and redox chemistry. (Occasionally)
EVE 511. Engineering for Development (3 hours)
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Study of appropriate engineering solutions and technology to deliver water and control environmental pollutants found in a developing world setting and smaller communities in North America. Concepts of sustainable development are covered. Topics are drawn from several areas of engineering, including water supply, water treatment, water storage, wastewater treatment, materials, indoor air, and construction. (Every two years)
EVE 512 Green Engineering (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EGR 235 and graduate standing.
Study of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies (Solar PV, Solar Thermal, Hydroelectricity, Geothermal), including low-cost energy technology applications for household use in contexts in the United States, as well as in developing countries. Emphasis on behavior change to protect the environment. Other topics covered include Green Building, Green Transportation, Life Cycle Analysis, and Humanitarian Engineering. (Occasionally)
EVE 520. Solid Waste Management (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 112 and EVE 290.
Chemical, mechanical and biological equipment and instrumentation for the collection, processing and disposal of solid wastes are studied and designed. Federal, state, and local regulations regarding generation and disposal of wastes are covered. Handling and recycling of municipal wastes is emphasized. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every two years)
EVE 530. Bioremediation (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EVE 405 or EVE 505.
Introduction to the underlying microbial physiological/biochemical capabilities responsible for contaminant transformation, mathematical descriptions of biological processes, applications and limitations of microbial reactors, applications and limitations of in-situ bioremediation techniques currently used in field-scale remediation, and current and future directions of bioremediation research and field applications. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every year)
EVE 586. Public Health (3 hours)
Prerequisites: senior standing; EVE 405 or EVE 505, EVE 420 or EVE 520, and EGR 252.
Co-requisite: EVE 402 or EVE 502.
Public health engineering principles for protection against biological and chemical hazards. Introduction to toxicology and epidemiology. Basic risk assessment concepts as applied to water, airborne, and toxic pollutants. Emphasis on major communicable diseases that plague mankind, organisms that cause them, routes of transmission, and engineering control methods. Appropriate control methods, for rural areas and developing countries. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Every year)
EVE 589. Environmental Toxicology (3 hours)
Prerequisites: EVE 486 or EVE 586.
A study of the harmful effects that result from exposures to chemical agents in humans and other organisms. Toxicity, dose and response, the immune system, regulatory considerations, and risk assessment. (Occasionally)
EVE 591, 592, 593. Special Topics (Occasionally) (1-6 hours)
EVE 603. Atmospheric Chemistry II (3 hours)
A presentation of the current understanding of the chemistry of the natural and polluted and lower atmosphere. Kinetics and reaction rates of the stratosphere and troposphere; analytical methods. (Occasionally)
EVE 605. Water Quality I (3 hours)
A study of the theory, analysis and design of wastewater treatment facilities for the reduction and elimination of organic and inorganic contaminants. (Occasionally)
EVE 606. Water Quality II (3 hours)
A study of the theory, analysis and design of water treatment facilities for the production of potable water from surface and ground waters. (Occasionally)
EVE 607. Unit Operations and Processes in Environmental Engineering (3 hours)
Prerequisites: EVE 290 and graduate standing.
A study of the theory and design of unit operations and processes used for treating water and wastewater. (Occasionally)
EVE 610. Environmental Chemistry (3 hours)
Applied, environmental aspects of physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry; including application of the phenomena of precipitation, complexation, buffering capacity, and chemical equilibrium. The nomenclature and properties of organic compounds. (Occasionally)
 
EVE 611. Research Methods in Engineering for Development (3 hours)
Prerequisite: graduate standing.
The course is designed to familiarize students with the basic principles and techniques in conducting formative research (primarily qualitative) for program development in the engineering for development field, with an emphasis on environmental issues. The major topics include: principles of formative research design, qualitative data collection methods, interviewing techniques, qualitative data analysis, survey design, pretesting and implementation, ethical principles and protection of human subjects. (Every two years)
EVE 613. Urban Aerosols (3 hours)
A study of the formation, concentrations, and compositions of urban aerosols. Sampling and measurement techniques; gas-aerosol partitioning; secondary aerosols; climate change impacts. (Occasionally)
EVE 615. Biotechnology (3 hours)
Develop an understanding of the stoichiometric and kinetic fundamentals of microbiological processed used in environmental control and remediation. Apply those fundamentals to the design and operation of the major processes used in environmental biotechnology. (Occasionally)
EVE 620. Design of Municipal Solid Waste Landfills (3 hours)
Concepts and calculations associated with the design and modeling of ‘typical’ RCRA subtitle-D landfills as well as advanced treatment ‘bioreactor’ landfills. (Occasionally)
EVE 630. Environmental Assessment and Remediation (3 hours)
Covers the clean-up of sites contaminated with hazardous waste along with an overview of regulations and related definitions. Objectives of remedial action and site investigations and the implementation of the in-situ and of-site treatment technologies. (Occasionally)
EVE 652. Environmental Engineering Statistics II (3 hours)
Prerequisites: EGR 252.
A study of the practices and techniques used to analyze environmental data. Practical statistical methods are applied to real-world problems encountered by environmental engineers. (Occasionally)
EVE 685. Stormwater Management (3 hours)
Theories, applications, and modeling of storm water quality and quantity. Management of post-development runoff will be emphasized. (Occasionally)
EVE 686. Environmental Epidemiology (3 hours)
A study of the frequency and patterns of disease that are influenced by environmental factors. Chemical, biological and physical agents; social settings and factors affecting human contact with these agents; natural disasters. (Occasionally)
EVE 690. Fate and Transport of Groundwater Contaminants (3 hours)
Theories, applications, and modeling of the physical, chemical, and biological transport and transformation processes affecting groundwater contaminants. (Occasionally)
EVE 691, 692, 693. Special Topics (Occasionally) (1-6 hours)
EVE 698. Professional Seminar (Occasionally) (1-6 hours)
EVE 699. Thesis Research (Occasionally) (1-6 hours)
A maximum of six hours may be counted toward the degree. Only grades of satisfactory or unsatisfactory will be assigned