MaconCatalog : The School of Engineering : Degree Programs : Engineering/Technical Management (M.S.E. /M.S.)
 
Engineering/Technical Management (M.S.E. /M.S.)
The Engineering/Technical Management Master’s Degree program builds upon bachelor’s degree preparation in several engineering disciplines and other technical programs such as physics, chemistry, quantitative business administration, etc. Its purpose is to prepare people to successfully address supervisory and managerial needs in a technological environment. The engineering manager’s role is viewed as the link between management and technical expertise, and involves matching resources in uncoordinated areas, working through people, and making and implementing management decisions, while simultaneously formulating technical strategies.
This program combines the concepts of management and business administration with the technical expertise developed in engineering, mathematics, and the quantitative sciences. Students will take courses in finance for technical managers, program management, operations research, and engineering economy. They will also select several courses to build directly upon their bachelor’s area of preparation.
Admission Requirements
Each candidate is evaluated separately for admission to the program. However, the following general guidelines will help potential students assess their suitability for the program.
A candidate should:
1. Hold a bachelor’s degree or be earning a bachelor’s degree from an ABET accredited or equivalent engineering program (for the M.S.E. in Engineering Management) or in a discipline that emphasizes quantitative reasoning and analysis (for the M.S. in Technical Management). Such disciplines include, but are not limited to, mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, computer science, and economics.
2. Be proficient in written and spoken English.
3. Have completed these undergraduate courses:
a. Mathematics through calculus
b. Calculus based probability and statistics course
c. Computer programming
d. Economics (preferably Engineering Economy).
The program director, on a case-by-case basis, has considerable leeway to offer provisional admission to candidates whose work experience, maturity, or motivation appear to outweigh deficits in undergraduate preparation.
The master of science in engineering in engineering management and the master of science in technical management curricula require that a total of 30 semester hours of graduate coursework be completed. The program can be arranged with either a thesis option or an all coursework option.
 
For Both Options
 
ETM 620. Probability and Statistics
3 hours
Additional approved ETM graduate coursework (cannot include ETM 697 or ETM 699 and 9 hours must be at the 600 level)
15 hours
Sub-total
18 hours
 
 
For the Thesis Option:
 
ETM 699. Thesis Research
6 hours
Approved 500 or 600 level electives from the School of Engineering, the School of Business, or with the consent of the student’s advisor and program director (cannot include ETM 699)
6 hours
Total hours for Thesis Option
30 hours
 
 
For the all Coursework Option:
 
Approved 500 or 600 level electives from the School of Engineering, the School of Business, or with the consent of the student’s advisor and program director (cannot include ETM 699)
12 hours
Total hours for all Coursework Option
30 hours
 
A minimum of 18 hours (excluding research and independent study hours) of 600 level courses are required for either option.
Engineering/Technical Management Minor
Admission to the minor requires the approval of the engineering management program director. Students approved for this minor complete a minimum of 9 semester hours at the 600 level. If at all possible, the student should take ETM 643 as one of these courses.
ETM Courses
ETM 503. Modeling and Simulation Application (3 hours)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Applications of and theory behind queuing models and the application of discrete event simulation to model service and manufacturing systems. (Note: credit will not be given for both ISE 403 and ETM 503). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 510. Human Factors Engineering (3 hours)
Prerequisite: ISE 311 or permission of instructor.
Human-machine systems modeling and design for human interaction with complex systems such as nuclear power plants, aircraft, and automated manufacturing systems. Models of human information processing, perception, memory, decision making and error generation. Design of interfaces for complex systems, including human-computer interfaces. (Note: credit will not be given for both ISE 412 and ETM 512). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 525. Computer Assisted Manufacturing Systems (3 hours)
Prerequisite: ISE 370 or permission of instructor.
Introduction to computer assisted manufacturing product specification; geometric tolerancing; computer-aided design; geometric modeling; process engineering; tooling and fixing; programmable logic controllers; data communication and LANs in manufacturing; fundamentals of numerical control; numerical control programming; rapid prototyping; and industrial robotics. (Note: credit will not be given for both ISE 425 and ETM 525). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 528. Quality Engineering (3 hours)
Prerequisite: IDM 355 or ISE 327 or permission of instructor.
Statistical decision making. Cost of Quality. Six Sigma. Lean Enterprise in Service and Manufacturing. Quality Function Development. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis. Management's role in assuring quality. Case studies in design and implementation of quality systems. (Note: credit will not be given for both ISE 428 and ETM 528). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 529. Robotics (3 hours)
Prerequisite: ISE 370 or permission of instructor.
Introduction to robotics. Robot arm kinematics and dynamics. Trajectory planning and control of robot manipulators. Sensing and vision capabilities of robots. Robot programming languages. Robot intelligence and task planning. Integrated laboratory assignments. (Note: credit will not be given for both ISE 429 and ETM 529). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 543. Project Management (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EGR 312 or FIN 362 or (consent of the instructor).
Tools and techniques for managing engineering projects. Includes both the technical aspects (work breakdown structures, cost estimating, CPM/PERT, scheduling, etc.) and the human aspects (organizational culture, management structures, leadership, etc.) Integrated case studies and team exercises. (NOTE: credit will not be given for both ETM 543 and ETM 643.) This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 545. Innovation and Product Development (3 hours)
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Introduction to the conceptualization, design, and development of new products. Concepts of innovation, ideation, user-centered design, prototyping, and testing. Consideration of issues such as design optimization and the social, environmental, economic, and political implications of design. Exploration of current research and best practices in innovation and product development. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 556. Supply Chain and Logistics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ISE 362 or permission of instructor.
Components in supply chain systems; designing and managing supply chain in a typical logistics environment, product life-cycle modeling, rotational production and supply, integrated component supply systems, multi-source supplier and buyer systems, just-in-time supply chain systems, warehousing and distribution systems, transportation management, distribution network design, and information technology for supply chain system. Emphasis on Research projects in the area of supply chain and logistics. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 560. Facilities Planning and Design (3 hours)
Prerequisite: ISE 370 or permission of instructor.
Comprehensive design of industrial production systems. Determination of requirements, generation and evaluation of alternatives, process design, materials handling, and location analysis. (Note: credit will not be given for both ISE 460 and ETM 560). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 565. Information Systems Engineering (3 hours)
Prerequisites: EGR 126 or IST 220; or permission of instructor and graduate standing.
Analysis and design of information systems; information systems management practices; database management system; end-user software for communication, data transformation, collaboration, information systems security and problem-solving. (Occasionally)
ETM 568. Healthcare Process Improvement (3 hours)
Prerequisite: EGR 252 or (consent of the instructor).
Tools and techniques for improving the delivery of healthcare. Lean and Six Sigma process improvement methodologies. Application of both parametric and non-prarametric statistical analysis. (Note: Credit will not be given for both ETM 568 and ISE 468.) This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 582. Engineering Innovation and Creativity (3 hours)
This is an engineering technical elective open to those students who have selected and been accepted into the MEEEP. The course will focus on integrating elements of entrepreneurship with engineering. New venture creations and creation of new product lines with existing businesses are analyzed through case studies and semester projects. (Note: credit will not be given for both EGR 482 and ETM 582). This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 584. 3D Modeling and Rapid Prototyping (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ISE 370 or permission of instructor.
Production design, 3D Modeling, and CAD and related software. Basic principles, development, and process chain of rapid prototyping/additive manufacturing. Photopolymerization processes; powder based fusion processes; extrusion-based systems; printing processes; sheet lamination processes; beam deposition processes; direct write technologies; design for rapid prototyping/additive manufacturing; guidelines for process selection; software issues and direct digital manufacturing; medical applications; post processing; use of multiple materials; business opportunities and future directions; integrated 3D scanning and 3D printing lab experiments. Hands-on research projects in 3D modeling and rapid prototyping. This course is available only to students enrolled in a graduate program and contains learning activities consistent with a graduate level engineering course. (Occasionally)
ETM 591, 592, 593. Special Topics (1-6 hours)
Graduate level courses composed of selected undergraduate technical electives and additional requirements beyond those specified for undergraduate students. (Occasionally)
ETM 607. Modeling and Simulation (3 hours)
Defining and analyzing problems; deterministic vs probabilistic models; continuous vs discrete models; data requirements and structures; developing computer models; debugging and documentation; validation. (Occasionally)
ETM 610. Economic Analysis for Managers (3 hours)
An in-depth treatment of engineering economy applied to engineering and management problems. Taxation; measuring the worth of projects; selecting among multiple alternatives; capital budgeting models; comparing risky projects; replacement analysis. (Occasionally)
ETM 620. Applications of Probability and Statistics (3 hours)
Probability distributions; sampling theory; hypothesis testing; single and multifactor analysis of variance; linear regression and correlation; multiple regression; design and analysis of experiments; emphasis on non-deterministic problems faced by engineers and engineering managers. Stochastic processes. (Every two years)
ETM 627. Quality Management (3 hours)
Quality philosophy and quality management concepts, leadership, quality standards, continuous improvement, quality tools, six-sigma, quality costs, employees’ participation, customer satisfaction, vendor quality, benchmarking, statistical process control, quality function deployment, design of experiments, Taguchi methods, on-line quality and information technology, case studies and success stories in quality, use of spreadsheets and statistical packages to solve real-world quality problems. (Occasionally)
ETM 639. Professionalism, Practice, and Ethics (3 hours)
Study of the ethical codes of professionals and the relation of these ethical norms to more generally accepted ethical values. Derivation of ethical structures. Delineation of the role of the engineer in assuring public health, safety and welfare. (Occasionally)
ETM 641. Reliability and Maintainability (3 hours)
Reliability and maintainability considerations during the equipment life cycle. (Occasionally)
ETM 643. Program Management I (3 hours)
Program management overview, systems theory and concepts, organization structures, organizing and staffing, general and program management functions. The program environment: problems and pitfalls, conflicts and their resolutions. Case analysis and term project. (Occasionally)
ETM 645. Operations Research I (3 hours)
Models and methods of operations research in solving deterministic engineering and management problems. Includes linear, integer, goal, and dynamic programming; network transportation and assignment problems; and inventory theory. (Occasionally)
ETM 647. Operations Research II (3 hours)
Models and methods of operations research in solving stochastic engineering and management problems. Includes Markov chains and decision processes; queuing theory and applications; nonlinear programming; decision analysis; and forecasting. (Occasionally)
ETM 655. Manufacturing Management (3 hours)
Science of manufacturing/automation, lean and agile manufacturing, theory of constraints, factory dynamics, aggregate planning and master scheduling, material requirement planning (MRP), work-in-process (WIP) inventory models, just-in-time (JIT) manufacturing, variability and flexibility in manufacturing, push and pull production systems, shop floor control, production scheduling, supply chain management, capacity management, economic decision making, case studies and real-world applications. (Occasionally)
ETM 657. The Profession in the 21st Century (3 hours)
The changing nature of professional practice. Communication among professionals over the network. Job pattern for the 21st Century. (Occasionally)
ETM 671. Ergonomics I (3 hours)
Man-machine interfaces and work station design. Practical examination of noise, vibration, light, and other factors that affect human performance. (Occasionally)
 
SPECIAL COURSES: ETM 691, 692, 693, 697 for variable credit. (Occasionally)
ETM 691, 692, 693. Special Topics—Lecture Based Courses (1-6 hours)
Special topics courses delivered in a traditional classroom or online (instructor led) setting.
ETM 697. Special Topics—Independent Study/Non-thesis Research (1-3 hours)
A maximum of 3 hours of independent study/non-thesis research may be counted toward the degree.
ETM 699. Thesis Research (1-6 hours)
A maximum of 6 hours of research may be counted toward the degree. Only grades of satisfactory or unsatisfactory will be assigned. (Occasionally)