MaconCatalog : The Stetson-Hatcher School of Business : COURSES OF INSTRUCTION : ECONOMICS (ECN)
 
ECONOMICS (ECN)
ECN 150. Principles of Microeconomics (3 hours)
Prerequisite: mathematics competency or completion of a college mathematics course.
This course requires the study of the basic tools of economic analysis and principles necessary to appreciate economic relationships, business behavior and consumer behavior. Special emphasis will be given to the areas of supply and demand, marginal analysis, and the theory of the firm. (Every semester)
ECN 151. Principles of Macroeconomics (3 hours)
Prerequisite: mathematics competency or completion of a college mathematics course.
The course requires the study and analysis of national income accounting, income determination theory, money and monetary policy, fiscal policy, international trade, and the theory of economic growth. Special attention will be given to current economic conditions and trends. (Every semester)
ECN 302. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150, 151, MAT 191 and junior status (or consent of instructor).
This course requires the study of price and distribution theory relevant to households, firms, and industries in perfect and imperfect competition. Theories of factor prices and general equilibrium are also examined. (Every year)
ECN 303. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150, 151 and junior status (or consent of instructor).
This course requires the study of the forces determining the level of income, employment, and prices. Monetary theory and the theory of economic fluctuations are reviewed, and public policies dealing with level-of-income and with aggregate economic welfare are examined. (Every year)
ECN 353. Introduction to Econometrics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: BUS 350, ECN 150, 151, STA 126 or MAT 320, and junior status (or consent of instructor).
This course requires the study of the methods of empirically verifying economic theory. The course will include the estimation of single and multiple equation models that are often used in economic analysis. A partial listing of topics covered includes: stochastic equations, residuals, parameter estimation via least squares and other methods, the coefficient of determination, multicollinearity, serial correlation, the identification problem, and estimation of simultaneous equation macro models of the U. S. economy. (Every year)
ECN 432. Urban and Regional Economics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course offers students the opportunity to study a variety of important social and economic phenomena in urban and regional settings. Topics covered in this course include an economic analysis of poverty, housing, land use, transportation, and public services, with special references to social problems arising from the uneven distribution and immobility of resources. (As needed)
ECN 436. Economics of Sports (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course examines economic issues pertaining to professional and amateur sports. Microeconomic theory is extended into this area of interest. Topics covered include the expansion of leagues, the economic impact of new stadiums, the economics of the media and sport, labor market issues of free agency, NCAA rules and collegiate sports. (Every year)
ECN 437. Law and Economics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course uses the tools of microeconomics to examine the effects of different legal rules, the efficiency of legal outcomes, and the economics of social and legal norms. The philosophies of judicial activism and rule-based law will be compared and contrasted. The economics of contracts, torts, property law, and antitrust law will also be explored. (As needed)
ECN 438. Public Finance (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course is a survey of public economics theory. Topics include social welfare, taxation, public goods, voting efficiencies, and the role of government. (As needed)
ECN 441. International Economics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course is a study of the theory and mechanisms of international trade and the international monetary mechanism. Barriers to the movement of goods and services, and recent developments in the international organizations aimed at relaxing restrictions, are also studied. Credit may not be earned in both ECN 441 and ECN/FIN 444. (Every year)
ECN 443. Labor Economics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course focuses on the economic behavior of labor markets. It includes a study of major labor issues in the United States and the social and economic policies affecting the labor movement. The economic organization of labor organizations and trade unionism will also be covered. The treatment of this area will also include discussions of recent and pending legislation in the states and nation. (As needed)
ECN 445. Industrial Organization (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course focuses on the industrial organization and government regulation of business enterprises, market structures. The course will focus on analyzing the conduct and performance of firms operating within various competitive environments. Particular attention will be given to the development and impact of antitrust regulation. (As needed)
ECN 448. Seminar in Economic Growth (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This is a seminar in the economic analysis of economic growth. Areas of emphasis are as follows: nature of growth; what is not growth; importance of growth; the physical environment issue; growth over time and among nations; sources of growth; theories of growth and supporting empirical evidence; interaction of growth with economic stability and income distribution; and institutional, monetary, and fiscal policies related to growth. (Occasionally)
ECN 450. The Economic and Moral Foundations of Capitalism (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
The course examines the interrelationship between economics and ethics. It sheds light on how an understanding of economics can lead to more ethical choices, and it also looks at how ethical ideas shape economic life. The course examines a number of topics, including justifications for property rights, the controversy over income inequality, the role of profits in an economic system, self-interest versus selfishness, social entrepreneurship, public aid and welfare, and many other topics. (Every year)
ECN 452. Environmental Economics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course is an examination of the interrelationship that exists between the physical environment and the economic system. Models of general equilibrium analysis, welfare economics, and property rights are developed; these are supplemented by readings from scholarly journals. Emphasis is placed upon the ability of free markets to allocate scarce environmental resources efficiently, across both space and time, among competing uses. (As needed)
ECN 456. Readings in Political Economy (1 hour)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151 (or consent of instructor).
The course is a seminar that focuses on current research in political economy. Students read current literature dealing with issues of political economy. Authors visit throughout the semester. Students can take the class up to three times. Hours in this class do not count toward upper level economics elective requirement. (As needed)
ECN 477. Special Topics in Economics (Subtitle) (1-3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150 and ECN 151.
This course provides an intensive study of some significant topic in economics that is not otherwise covered by the school’s course offerings. Topics will be chosen by faculty in consultation with students who register for the course. (As needed)
ECN 478. Research in Economics (Subtitle) (1-3 hours)
Prerequisites: ECN 150, 151, one ECN course numbered 300 or higher; or permission of instructor.
This course is a research-oriented course focusing on an important topic in economics that is not otherwise covered by the school’s offerings. The course features student research, independent study, and discussion. Topics will be chosen by faculty in consultation with students who register for the course. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. (As needed)
ECN 494. Honors Thesis (1 hour)
Prerequisite: admission to the honors program.
This course requires individual research leading to the completion of an honors thesis. Students admitted into the honors program register for one credit hour in each of three successive semesters (including summer). Only grades of satisfactory or unsatisfactory will be assigned. (As needed)