MaconCatalog : College of Liberal Arts and Sciences : ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS : HISTORY (HIS)
 
HISTORY (HIS)
John Thomas Scott, Chair/Professor
Wallace L. Daniel, Distinguished University Professor
Abigail P. Dowling, Assistant Professor
Sarah E. Gardner, Distinguished University Professor
Robert M. Good, Associate Professor
Anita Olson Gustafson, Professor
Matthew Harper, Associate Professor
Douglas E. Thompson, Professor
 
History students learn to think historically: to see how different forces have interacted in different contexts, to see how the past has shaped the present, and to see how today’s challenges are both unique and familiar. History majors become historians themselves by conducting and presenting their own research. Just as importantly, history majors and minors become versatile professionals and citizens who can ask good questions, find and use evidence persuasively, and manage complexity well.
 
Major in History
33 semester credit hours minimum
One introductory course:
HIS 105. Western Histories
HIS 176. American Founding Principles
Two intermediate courses:
HIS 201. The Ancient Mediterranean
HIS 210. The Twentieth-Century World
HIS 215. Atlantic Europe in the Ages of Exploration and Enlightenment, 1450-1815
HIS 220. Intermediate Topics in History
HIS 224. Sub-Saharan Africa to Independence
HIS 225. Latin America and the Caribbean
HIS 245. American Film as Art and History
HIS 250. America at War
HIS 275. Religion in the American Past
Three research and writing courses:
HIS 295. The Historian’s Craft
HIS 395. Studies in Historiography
HIS 495. Research Seminar in History
One United States course:
HIS 350. The United States in the Founding Era, 1763 to the 1840s
HIS 355. The World the Civil War Made: The United States from 1865 to the 1910s
HIS 356. The United States in the Civil War Era, 1840s-1865
HIS 359. The United States in the Global Era, 1910s-2001
HIS 361. The Rise and Fall of Plantation Slavery in the South
HIS 362. Twentieth-Century South
HIS 363. African American History
HIS 365. History of Georgia
HIS 370. An Intellectual History of America
HIS 377. American Women’s History
HIS 390. Topics in History
One Global course:
HIS 302. Ancient Rome, from Italy to Empire
HIS 307. Empires and Barbarians in Late Antiquity
HIS 310. Medieval Europe and Its Neighbors
HIS 317. Europe’s Bourgeois Century, 1815-1914
HIS 318. Wrecked and Rebuilt: Europe from 1914 to 1991
HIS 325. Revolution and Its Legacy in France
HIS 342. The Atlantic Slave Trade
HIS 345. Colonial Americas in a Transatlantic World
HIS 390. Topics in History
Three other 300 or 400-level courses (excluding HIS 401)
 
Students who major in history may attain Departmental Honors by (1) earning a grade of B+ or better in HIS 495 and (2) by attaining a grade point average of 3.75 in history courses and 3.50 overall.
Secondary Teacher Certification Program in History
A major in secondary social science education with certification for teaching grades 6-12 is available in history as a separate Bachelor of Science in Education degree through the College of Education. Students planning to teach history in secondary schools should notify their advisor and contact the chair of teacher education in the College of Education. Please consult the COLLEGE OF EDUCATION section of this catalog for complete degree requirements. This certification is approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
Students who want a major in history as well as certification for teaching in grades 6-12 may either (1) complete the requirements for two bachelor’s degrees or (2) qualify for certification through a post-baccalaureate program such as the Master of Arts in Teaching. See the requirements for dual degrees in the ACADEMIC INFORMATION section of this catalog (under Second Degree); see the GRADUATE STUDIES section of this catalog, College of Education, for information about the M.A.T. program.
 
Minor in History
The five-course (15 credit hours) minor may include at most two 100-level courses, and must include at least two courses numbered 300 or above (from any categories).
 
HIS 105. Western Histories (3 hours)
A thematic introduction to historical thinking spanning the major eras of Western history. As students examine the West’s development in a global context, they consider how historians pose questions, use evidence, and propose interpretations. (Every semester)
HIS 120. Introductory Topics in History: (Subtitle) (1-3 hours)
A rotating-topic module course designed for majors and non-majors alike. European, American, and global topics will be offered. Domestic or foreign travel may be required. Students may take different topics of the course twice and earn up to four hours (total) for credit toward graduation. Students must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least one contact hour, or equivalent, per week every hour of credit. (Occasionally)
HIS 176. American Founding Principles (3 hours)
(Same as PHI 176 and POL 176)
This course will study the major intellectual currents and ideas that informed the creation of the American republic. It will be divided into two main parts. First, the course ranges across the Western tradition in order to elucidate the elements most important to the American Founders. These elements include the classical traditions of Greece and Rome, the modern Enlightenment tradition, the Protestant tradition, and the British republican tradition. Second, the course examines the American Founding itself, focusing on the major issues and debates (from 1765-1800) that shaped the institutions and character of the regime. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the discussion of primary texts and documents. (Every year)
HIS 201. The Ancient Mediterranean (3 hours)
A study of the rise of civilization in the Near East, its flowering in Greece, and its merging into a Mediterranean culture. (Every two years)
HIS 210. The Twentieth-Century World (3 hours)
A history of world affairs from about 1900 through 2001, stressing the decline of the West’s technical and geopolitical dominance and various global reactions to the spread of the West’s liberal consumerism. (Every year)
HIS 215. Atlantic Europe in the Ages of Exploration and Enlightenment, 1450-1815 (3 hours)
A study of Atlantic Europe from 1450 to 1815 addressing subjects such as European overseas expansion, changes brought on by the Renaissance, Reformation and Enlightenment, the rise of fiscal-military statecraft, and the opening of the Age of Revolution. (Every two years)
HIS 220. Intermediate Topics in History: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A broadly defined study of a topic, region, or era. (Occasionally)
HIS 224. Sub-Saharan Africa to Independence (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 224)
A study of sub-Saharan Africa before and during imperialism, addressing the spread of Islam, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and the effects upon Africans of European trade, conquest, and administration. (Every two years)
HIS 225. Latin America and the Caribbean (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 225)
A study of Latin America and the Caribbean from the 15th century to the present addressing subjects such as indigenous culture, the establishment of European empires and African slavery in the region, 19th century independence movements, and 20th century national and economic developments. (Every two years)
HIS 245. American Film as Art and History (3 hours)
A study of films oriented around a common historical theme. This course will emphasize the study of films for their place in the history of the time, and for their reflection of and influence on American culture from their time of crafting through the late 20th century. (Every year)
HIS 250. America at War (3 hours)
A study of British North America and the United States at war from the early 16th century to the early 21st century addressing subjects such as colonial wars, wars in the early republic, the American Civil War, wars of expansion in the 19th century, and 20th and 21st century global wars. (Every two years)
HIS 275. Religion in the American Past (3 hours)
A study of the religious experiences of and the uses of scriptural and religious texts by inhabitants of colonial North America and the United States from the early seventeenth century to the late twentieth century, addressing topics such as religion in the colonial era, evangelicalism, the religious experiences of minority groups, and the interaction of religion and modernity. (Every other year) 
HIS 295. The Historian’s Craft (3 hours)
Prerequisites: HIS 105 or HIS 176 and sophomore standing.
An introduction to the basic vocabulary, source materials, research and writing methods, and historiographical issues in the discipline of history, with an emphasis on analytical and writing skills. The course is required for majors, who are strongly urged to enroll as sophomores. (Every year)
HIS 302. Ancient Rome, from Italy to Empire (3 hours)
A study of the origins of Rome and its eventual dominance from Persia to Britannia until 212 addressing the role of social classes, the army, politics, and architecture in the development of empire. (Every two years)
HIS 307. Empires and Barbarians in Late Antiquity (3 hours)
A study of the dissolution of the Roman Empire from 212 and the rise of the western successor kingdoms and Byzantine and Islamic Empires until 750 addressing subjects such as the Christianization of the Roman Empire, the impact of barbarian migrations/immigrations, the decline in trade, and the spread of Islam. (Every two years)
HIS 310. Medieval Europe and its Neighbors (3 hours)
A study of medieval culture and the rise of the Roman successor kingdoms from the Middle East to the British Isles from 750 to 1450, addressing the role of cities, trade, science, Christianity, and the “Other” in the formation of Europe. (Every two years)
HIS 317. Europe’s Bourgeois Century, 1815-1914 (3 hours)
A study of Europe’s transformations from the fall of Napoleon to the beginning of World War I addressing subjects such as the spread of trade, industries, cities, and global empires, the challenge of national cultures to noble and church influence, and the birth of a modernist counterculture. (Every three years)
HIS 318. Wrecked and Rebuilt: Europe from 1914 to 1991 (3 hours)
A study of Europe from World War I to the Soviet Union’s collapse, addressing the effects and legacies of totalitarian politics and the turns from imperial rivalries and wars to Cold War alliances and European Union. (Every three years)
HIS 325. Revolution and Its Legacy in France (3 hours)
A detailed study of the French Revolution, followed by a broader study of how the revolution's liberal, egalitarian, secular, and assimilationist ideals have defined and often polarized public life in France since 1789. (Every three years)
HIS 340. Critical Themes in Western Civilization: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A team-taught course addressing crucial themes that transcend conventionally defined fields of Western history, typically by pertaining to two or more continents. (Occasionally)
HIS 342. The Atlantic Slave Trade (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 342)
A study of the human trafficking of Africans across the Atlantic from the late 15th to the late 19th centuries addressing subjects such as the origins, expansion, and decline of the trade, how enslaved people coped and resisted, and the trade’s impact on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. (Every two years)
HIS 345. Colonial Americas in a Transatlantic World (3 hours)
A comparative study of the European Atlantic colonies from the age of Columbus to the end of the colonial era. The course focuses primarily on the Spanish, French, and British colonies and examines patterns of exploration, colonization, and settlement; developments in government, religion, and economics; and interactions of differing races, ethnicities, and nationalities. (Every two years)
HIS 350. The United States in the Founding Era, 1763 to the 1840s (3 hours)
A study of the formation and establishment of the United States addressing subjects such as the road to revolution, independence and the creation of a national republic, early industrialism and westward expansion, and the rise of sectional tensions in the age of Andrew Jackson. (Every two years)
HIS 355. The World the Civil War Made: The United States from 1865 to the 1910s (3 hours)
A study of post-Civil War America addressing subjects such as Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, Jim Crowism, westward migration, finance capitalism, military and cultural imperialism, and Progressivism. (Every two years)
HIS 356. The United States in the Civil War Era, 1840s-1865 (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 356)
A study of the Civil War era addressing subjects such as Abolitionism, the rise of Confederate nationalism and the division of the Union, military conflict surrounding sectionalism, emancipation of enslaved peoples, and the restoration of the Union. (Every two years)
HIS 359. The United States in the Global Era, 1910s-2001 (3 hours)
A study of the United States from the First World War to 9/11 addressing subjects such as America’s emergence as a global power through wars, diplomacy, and technology, America’s struggles with civil rights for African Americans and others, and the effects pf prosperity and consumerism at home and in relation to the rest of the world. (Every two years)
HIS 361. The Rise and Fall of Plantation Slavery in the South (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 361)
The study of the American South from the beginnings of European settlement to the Civil War. Slavery, the development of southern culture, and other topics are emphasized. (Every two years)
HIS 362. Twentieth-Century South (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 362)
A study of the American South from the 1910s to the turn of the 21st century addressing such issues as race relations, industrialization of the region, and the evolution of southern culture. (Every two years)
HIS 363. African American History (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 363)
A study of important aspects of African American history from the colonial era to the present addressing such subjects as resistance to slavery and white supremacy, migration, cultural and intellectual contributions, gender and family, internationalism, and political activism. (Every two years)
HIS 365. History of Georgia (3 hours)
A political, economic, social, and cultural survey of Georgia from its founding to the present. (Every summer)
HIS 370. An Intellectual History of America (3 hours)
A study of the main economic, political, religious, and social ideas that have shaped American history from its European origins to the present. (Every two years)
HIS 377. American Women’s History (3 hours)
(Same as WGS 377)
A study of the meaning and place of women in American society from the colonial era to the present addressing subjects such as family, sexuality, work, and reform, within the broader context of American history. (Every two years)
HIS 390. Topics in History: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A study of a specific topic, region, or era. Counts toward the relevant 300-level group (United States or Global). May be repeated with different topics. (Occasionally)
HIS 395. Studies in Historiography (3 hours)
Prerequisites: HIS 105 or HIS 176 and HIS 295 for history majors; two history courses for history minors; consent of instructor for all others.
A comparative study of classic and contemporary works of history, emphasizing the different priorities, assumptions, and approaches of Western historians from antiquity to the present. (Every year)
HIS 401. Internship in Public History (1-3 hours)
Prerequisites: HIS 295 and junior or senior standing.
A research-oriented internship on a topic of local or regional historical interest undertaken in conjunction with a community partner organization, culminating in a project appropriate to the topic addressed and/or the needs of the cooperating community partner organization. Hours earned in HIS 401 do not count toward the minimum credit requirements for the 33-hour major or the 15-hour minor. Students, under the direction of a faculty member and an on-site supervisor, must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least three on-site hours per week for every hour of credit. May be repeated for up to 9 credit hours toward graduation. Graded S/U. (Occasionally)
HIS 490. Advanced Topics in History: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
An advanced seminar on a specific topic, region, or era, with a relevant prerequisite. Counts toward the history major’s 300-level course requirement. (Occasionally)
HIS 495. Research Seminar in History (3 hours)
Prerequisite: HIS 295.
A course restricted to students majoring in history. Emphasizing intensive research conducted by the individual student and directed by instructors, the seminar enables students to compare historical methods and perspectives, examine specific historical problems, and sharpen their skills as researchers and writers. (Every fall)
HIS 499. Supervised Independent Research (3 hours)
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and consent of instructor.
Intensive reading on a selected topic in an area of special interest to the student. The program of study must be agreed upon with the instructor and cleared with the chair of the department in advance of registration. (Occasionally)