MaconCatalog : College of Liberal Arts and Sciences : ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS : ENGLISH (ENG)
 
ENGLISH (ENG)
Jonathan C. Glance, Chair/Professor of English
David A. Davis, Associate Professor
Chester J. Fontenot, Jr, Professor
Elizabeth Harper, Associate Professor
Gordon R. Johnson, Professor
James May, Visiting Lecturer of Integrative Studies and Writer in Residence
Mary Alice Morgan, Professor
Chelsea Rathburn, Assistant Professor
Gary A. Richardson, Professor
Deneen Senasi, Associate Professor
Andrew Silver, Professor
 
The English Department offers two majors: English and Creative Writing. For a description of the latter, please see the CREATIVE WRITING heading of this catalog.
 
Major in English
30-33 semester credit hours minimum
Introduction to Literary Study—one course from:
ENG 221. Prison Narratives
ENG 224. The Study of a Literary Theme in Western Heritage
ENG 225. The Study of a Literary Theme in Religious Heritage
ENG 226. The Study of a Literary Theme in Creative Expression
ENG 233. The Study of Drama
ENG 234. The Study of Fiction
ENG 235. The Study of Poetry
ENG 237. Literature and Film
ENG 263. Survey of British Literature I
ENG 264. Survey of British Literature II
ENG 265. Survey of American Literature
Methods of Literary Study:
ENG 301. Introduction to Literary Studies
Author Study—one course from:
ENG 320. Shakespeare I: Early Plays
ENG 321. Shakespeare II: Later Plays
ENG 330. Chaucer
ENG 335. Milton
ENG 382. Special Topics in Literature and Film [topic must concern no more than 2 authors]
ENG 383. Special Topics in Author Study [topic must concern no more than 2 authors]
Genre Study—one course from:
ENG 349. The English Novel
ENG 354. The American Novel
ENG 362. Modern Poetry
ENG 364. Modern Drama
ENG 366. Modern Fiction
ENG 367. Contemporary Drama
ENG 368. Contemporary Poetry
ENG 369. Contemporary Fiction
ENG 382. Special Topics in Literature and Film [topic must involve genre study]
ENG 384. Special Topics in Genre Study
Historical or Cultural Study—one course from:
ENG 340. Sixteenth-Century Literature
ENG 342. Seventeenth-Century Literature
ENG 346. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature
ENG 347. Poetry and Prose of the Romantic Movement
ENG 348. Victorian Poetry and Prose
ENG 352. Romanticism in American Literature
ENG 353. Realism in American Literature
ENG 357. Southern Literature to 1900
ENG 358. Southern Literature since 1900
ENG 359. African American Literature: Beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance
ENG 360. African American Literature: Harlem Renaissance to the Present
ENG 382. Special Topics in Literature and Film (topic must involve historical or cultural study)
ENG 385. Special Topics in Historical or Cultural Study
Language Study or Writing—one course from:
ENG 307. Essay Writing
ENG 308. Writing Narrative Poetry
ENG 309. Writing Short Fiction
ENG 311. Writing Lyric Poetry
ENG 312. Writing the Long Story
ENG 323. History of the English Language
ENG 325. Contemporary Theories in Linguistics
ENG 329. Twentieth-Century Literary Theory and Criticism
ENG 371. Beginning Playwriting
ENG 372. Screenwriting
ENG 386. Special Topics in Language Study or Writing
ENG 390. Public Writing
ENG 483. Advanced Playwriting Workshop
ENG 485. Ferrol Sams, Jr., Distinguished Chair of English Seminar in Fiction, Poetry, or Drama
ENG 487. Advanced Creative Writing Workshop
Experiential Study—one course (0–3 hours) from:
WRT 490. Writing Preceptorship (fulfills EXP 408)
ENG 498. Internship in Editing, Writing, or Research (fulfills EXP 407)
ENG 488. Independent Study for Honors in English (fulfills EXP 401)
EXP 401. Supervised Undergraduate Research (with departmental approval)
EXP 402. Creative Activity in the Arts (with departmental approval)
EXP 403. Service-Learning (with departmental approval)
EXP 404. Study Away (with departmental approval)
EDUC 492. Student Teaching (with departmental approval)
Four ENG electives (at least three courses at the 300-level or above) chosen in consultation with the chair or academic advisor
 
Majors in English may attain Departmental Honors by: (1) successfully completing the above requirements; (2) successfully completing ENG 329 or its equivalent and 488 under the direction of an Honors Committee composed of the chair and two members of the English Department selected by the student. Students should register for ENG 488 in the spring semester of their junior year and complete the Honors paper by March 15 of the senior year; and (3) a grade point average of 3.50 in upper-division English classes.
Secondary Teacher Certification Program in English
A major in secondary English education with certification for teaching grades 6-12 is available in English as a separate Bachelor of Science in Education degree through the College of Education. Students planning to teach English in secondary schools should notify their advisor and contact the chair of teacher education in the College of Education. Please consult the COLLEGE OF EDUCATION section of this catalog for complete degree requirements. This certification is approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
Students who want a major in English as well as certification for teaching in grades 6-12 may either (1) complete the requirements for two bachelor’s degrees or (2) qualify for certification through a post-baccalaureate program such as the Master of Arts in Teaching. See the requirements for dual degrees in the ACADEMIC INFORMATION section of this catalog (under Second Degree); see the GRADUATE STUDIES section of this catalog, College of Education, for information about the M.A.T. program.
 
Minor in English
15 semester credit hours minimum
One ENG course numbered above ENG 100
One course from:
ENG 221. Prison Narratives
ENG 222. Introduction to Creative Writing
ENG 224. The Study of a Literary Theme in Western Heritage
ENG 225. The Study of a Literary Theme in Religious Heritage
ENG 226. The Study of a Literary Theme in Creative Expression
ENG 233. The Study of Drama
ENG 234. The Study of Fiction
ENG 235. The Study of Poetry
ENG 237. Literature and Film
ENG 263. Survey of British Literature I
ENG 264. Survey of British Literature II
ENG 265. Survey of American Literature
Three ENG courses numbered 300 or above
 
ENG 108. Composition I (4 hours)
Prerequisite: permission of English Department chair.
This course focuses on the expository essay, the basic form of college writing. It includes an introduction to research. The student is expected to be familiar with standards of correctness, including punctuation and grammar. This course is offered only in summer terms for provisionally admitted students or for non-native speakers of English during the regular year.
ENG 221. Prison Narratives (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 221)
This course is designed to help students understand the development of the American prison system from a historical-critical perspective as well as from a prisoner perspective. In this course, students will become aware of the changing nature of American prisons from slavery, through state and federally owned institutions, to private for-profit systems. Students will read works about prisons from a number of different genres. (Every year)
ENG 222. Introduction to Creative Writing (3 hours) 
This course teaches the practice of creative expression through the study of poetry and prose works in the major literary genres (fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and drama). In addition to learning how to examine texts closely and carefully, as professional writers do, the student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write both critically and creatively. (Every year) 
ENG 224. The Study of a Literary Theme in Western Heritage: (Variable Topic) (3 hours)
This course examines themes related to Western Heritage through various literary works. In addition to learning how to examine texts closely and carefully, the student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write critically. (Occasionally)
ENG 225. The Study of a Literary Theme in Religious Heritage: (Variable Topic) (3 hours)
This course examines themes related to Religious Heritage through various scriptural texts and literary works. In addition to learning how to examine texts closely and carefully, the student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write critically. (Occasionally)
ENG 226. The Study of a Literary Theme in Creative Expression: (Variable Topic) (3 hours)
This course examines themes related to Creative Expression through various literary works. In addition to learning how to examine texts closely and carefully, the student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write critically. (Occasionally)
ENG 233. The Study of Drama (3 hours)
A study of drama from various periods with emphasis on forms, ideas, techniques, and meaning. The student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write critically. (Every year)
ENG 234. The Study of Fiction (3 hours)
A study of novels and short stories from various periods with emphasis on forms, ideas, techniques, and meaning. The student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write critically. (Every semester)
ENG 235. The Study of Poetry (3 hours)
A study of poetry from various periods with emphasis on forms, ideas, techniques, and meaning. The student will be required to develop an ability to read, think, and write critically. (Every year)
ENG 237. Literature and Film (3 hours)
The critical study of film as a literary text. Selected novels and their film adaptations will be studied in order to explore the differences and similarities between written and cinematic forms. (Every year)
ENG 263. Survey of British Literature I (3 hours)
A chronological survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Students will inquire about, reflect upon, and interpret major literary works that codify and problematize Western values. Students will gain greater understanding of political, religious, and social developments from the Anglo-Saxon era in England to the Restoration of the monarchy after the English Civil War. Readings will explore human nature, human relationships, and/or humans’ relation to the divine. (Every semester)
ENG 264. Survey of British Literature II (3 hours)
A chronological survey of English literature from the Romantic Age to the contemporary period. The transformation of England during these centuries highlights the dominant forces that characterized late Western society and created our present. English literature in this course explores the ramifications of, celebrates, and bemoans these changes. Students engage the Western tradition, facilitating historical consciousness and awareness of major developments, through features that are more pronounced within literature. (Occasionally)
ENG 265. Survey of American Literature (3 hours)
A chronological overview of major works of American literature that provides insights into diverse authors’ reactions to the social and artistic movements of their era. Topics may include slavery and abolitionism, industrialization, urban migration, responses to war, and responses to issues such as civil rights and the women’s movement. Artistically, students will learn about movements such as romanticism, realism, modernism, and post-modernism. (Occasionally)
ENG 301. Introduction to Literary Studies (3 hours)
This course introduces students to literary criticism and the methodologies of literary scholarship. It is intended to prepare English majors for advanced work in upper-division courses. Required for the English major. (Every semester)
ENG 307. Creative Approaches to Nonfiction (3 hours)
This course teaches the writing of creative nonfiction using conventional essay-writing techniques as well as more innovative methods such as those of New Journalism and the lyric essay. Students read widely in nonfiction in order to learn forms, conventions, and writing techniques which they then deploy in their own writing. (Every two years)
ENG 308. Writing Narrative Poetry (3 hours)
This course teaches the writing of poetry based on traditional and contemporary models with an emphasis on narrative and the use of personae. Students read widely in poetry in order to learn forms, conventions, and writing techniques which they then deploy in their own writing. (Every year)
ENG 309. Writing Short Fiction (3 hours)
This course teaches the writing of short form fiction based on traditional and contemporary models with an emphasis on narrative, plot, and character development. Students read widely in the short story form in order to learn conventions and writing techniques which they then deploy in their own writing. (Every year).
ENG 311. Writing Lyric Poetry (3 hours)
This course teaches the writing of poetry based on traditional and contemporary models with an emphasis on traditional form and lyricism. Students read widely in poetry in order to learn forms, conventions, and writing techniques which they then deploy in their own writing. (Every year)
ENG 312. Writing the Long Story (3 hours)
This course teaches the writing of sustained stories and the novella based on traditional and contemporary models. Students read widely in these longer forms of fiction in order to learn conventions and writing techniques which they then deploy in their own writing. (Every year)
ENG 320. Shakespeare I: Early Plays (3 hours)
A study of Shakespeare’s dramatic works before 1601, including comedies, such as Twelfth Night, English history plays, such as Henry V, and early tragedies, such as Hamlet. The course examines questions of language, convention, and performance, while working to develop students’ skills as thoughtful close readers of Shakespeare’s works. Issues of genre, gender, race and ethnicity, class, and identity are also considered, focusing on how such categories both reflect and help to create early modern culture, and how the plays’ exploration of these aspects of human experience continue to be relevant in the twenty-first century. (Every year)
ENG 321. Shakespeare II: Later Plays (3 hours)
A study of Shakespeare’s dramatic works between 1601 and 1613. Plays to be considered include major tragedies, such as Othello, so-called problem plays, such as Measure for Measure, and the romances, such as The Tempest. The course examines questions of language, convention, and performance, while working to develop students’ skills as thoughtful close readers of Shakespeare’s works. Issues of genre, gender, race and ethnicity, class, and identity are also considered, focusing on how such categories reflect and help to create early modern culture, and how the plays’ exploration of these aspects of human experience continue to be relevant in the twenty-first century. (Every year)
ENG 323. History of the English Language (3 hours)
The history of modern British and American English is traced from the Indo-European beginnings through the Anglo-Saxon, medieval, and modern periods to the present trends in linguistic study. (Occasionally)
ENG 325. Contemporary Theories in Linguistics (3 hours)
This course includes the study of phonetics, morphology, structural linguistics, and transformational grammar. It is intended to acquaint students with the recent scientific approach to the study of English grammar. (Occasionally)
ENG 329. Twentieth-Century Literary Theory and Criticism (3 hours)
A study of literary theory and criticism in the twentieth century, focused on major groups and movements. Regularly included are such schools as Formalism, Structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. (Occasionally)
ENG 330. Chaucer (3 hours)
This course focuses primarily upon The Canterbury Tales with some work on Troilus and Criseyde and minor poems. Attention is given to Middle English pronunciation and poetics. Lectures, reports, and collateral readings will concern the Medieval background. (Every two years)
ENG 335. Milton (3 hours)
John Milton embodies the English Renaissance after Shakespeare, capturing the sweeping changes in seventeenth-century England with rhetorical complexity, religious passion, and profound learning in a poetic voice of extraordinary power and grace. This course follows Milton’s far-ranging career, linking ideas that commanded his attention—as scholar, religious reformer, rhetorician, political operative, and above all, as poet—with the rich history of seventeenth-century British culture. (Occasionally)
ENG 340. Sixteenth-Century Literature (3 hours)
A survey of the literature of the English Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the work of Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, Sir Philip Sidney, and Sir Francis Bacon, as well as to the non-dramatic poetry of Shakespeare. (Occasionally)
ENG 342. Seventeenth-Century Literature (3 hours)
This course explores two of the most compelling literary motives in seventeenth-century England: religious faith and earthly desire. Although seemingly opposed, they are inextricably linked in that century’s literary, cultural, and spiritual desire for fame, recognition, love, pleasure, and the joys of poetry itself. The course explores the works of Jonson, Herrick, Donne, Marvell, and others and asks: what is it that these writers desire, and how do they imagine achieving it? (Occasionally)
ENG 346. Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3 hours)
Using the works of canonical figures such as Dryden, Pope, Addison, Swift, Defoe, Fielding, Johnson, Goldsmith and Gray, this course charts transformations of English poetry and drama, as well as the emergence of the literary essay and novel. In addition, examination of criminal narratives, working class poetry, spiritual autobiographies, and slave narratives provides a contrasting, non-elite perspective to the period. In sum, the course provides a comprehensive investigation of literary responses to the promises and problems – individual and collective – of the Enlightenment. (Occasionally)
ENG 347. Poetry and Prose of the Romantic Movement (3 hours)
A study of the themes, cultural contexts and development of English Romanticism, through the poetry and prose—both essays and fiction—of authors such as Blake, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys, Hemans, and Keats. (Every two years)
ENG 348. Victorian Poetry and Prose (3 hours)
This course studies the major writers of the Victorian age in Britain. In order to best understand these authors, we will read them alongside cultural documents that illuminate the concerns of the age, including industrialization, the roles of men and women, religious faith, childhood, and the place of art in society. Authors whom we will study may include Tennyson, Dickens, Browning, the Brontës, the Rossettis, and Hopkins. (Every two years)
ENG 349. The English Novel (3 hours)
An overview of the development of the English novel through representative works by major authors, such as Richardson, Austen, Dickens, Thackeray, Eliot, and Hardy. Discussions will explore central themes of the English novel: marriage, money, morals and manners, and gendered concepts of and attitudes toward ruin. (Every two years)
ENG 352. Romanticism in American Literature (3 hours)
An exploration of the wildly fertile period of literary and religious experimentation from 1820-1865. The class will explore America’s first counter-cultural movement in transcendentalism, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville’s energetic responses to that movement, and the best-selling female authors that Nathaniel Hawthorne called “mad scribbling women.” The course concludes with a study of Emily Dickinson’s attempt to bridge the gap between the spiritual rigors of Calvinism and the new freedom of transcendentalism. (Every two years)
ENG 353. Realism in American Literature (3 hours)
A study of literature from one of the most controversial and turbulent eras in American history, from Reconstruction to the rise of modernism. The class will explore American literature’s struggle to address the great fractures of American life during the Gilded Age, from the failures of inter-racial democracy to the rise of worker unrest to the struggle for women’s rights. Authors may include Louisa May Alcott, Francis Harper, Charles Chesnutt, Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Rebecca Harding Davis, William Dean Howells, Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, and Upton Sinclair. (Every two years)
ENG 354. The American Novel (3 hours)
A survey of the development of the American novel from its beginnings to the early twentieth century to show how the American novel has become both uniquely American and a major form of American letters. Hawthorne, Melville, Howells, James, Dreiser, and others will be studied. (Every two years)
ENG 357. Southern Literature to 1900 (3 hours)
A study of southern literature from colonization to the beginning of the twentieth century. This class explores the complicated origins of the U.S. South, the literature of slavery and abolition, the cultural legacy of the Civil War and Reconstruction, southern literary regionalism, the New South phenomenon, and the rise of Jim Crow. Authors may include Thomas Jefferson, Southwestern Humorists, Augusta Jane Evans, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Joel Chandler Harris, Mark Twain, Local Color Writers, Kate Chopin and Charles Chesnutt. (Every two years)
ENG 358. Southern Literature since 1900 (3 hours)
A study of southern literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. This class covers southern modernism and post-modernism and explores the Lost Cause, southern modernism, the World Wars, the civil rights movement, and the rise of the Sunbelt. Authors may include Dorothy Allison, Thomas Dixon, Ellen Glasgow, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Natasha Trethewey, Alice Walker, Richard Wright, and Eudora Welty. (Every two years)
ENG 359. African American Literature: Beginnings to Harlem Renaissance (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 359)
A survey of classic writings in African American literature presented in their historical contexts. The course includes essays analyzing the political and social status of African Americans at various points during the period and representative works by major poets and fiction writers. Reading lists vary from year to year, but generally include such authors as Brown, Chestnut, Harper, the Grimkes, Larsen, Bontemps, DuBois, and Washington. (Every year)
ENG 360. African American Literature: Harlem Renaissance to the Present (3 hours)
(Same as AFR 360)
A chronological study of the development of African American literature since the Harlem Renaissance. The course attempts to place African American literature in the context of world and American literature by examining prevalent themes and traditions as presented in fiction, poetry, and drama. Reading lists vary from year to year, but generally include such authors as Wright, Baldwin, Morrison, Angelou, Sanchez, Baraka, McMillan, Walker, and Wideman. (Every two years)
ENG 362. Modern Poetry (3 hours)
This course will examine modern poetry as a collection of literary movements with many different aesthetic and ideological permutations. Among the movements and trends that we will discuss are Imagism, High Modernism, Popular Modernism, Objectivism, and Confessionalism. We will become familiar with many of the most innovative and important authors writing from the 1870s through the 1960s. Authors whom we will study include Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Williams, Hughes, Millay, Cummings, Brooks, Ginsberg, Levertov, and Bishop. (Every two years)
ENG 364. Modern Drama (3 hours)
A journey through the most innovative, controversial, and revolutionary period in the history of modern theater, this class will explore explosive works of drama from the riot-inducing plays of Ibsen to the laugh-inducing nihilistic theater of the absurdists. Along the way students will read, among other works, Anton Chekhov’s tragic-comedies, August Strindberg’s vicious battles between the sexes, Bertolt Brecht’s comic-musical calls to rebellion, and Tennessee Williams’s navigations between desire and death. (Occasionally)
ENG 366. Modern Fiction (3 hours)
A study of major modernist innovations in form and techniques by the foremost writers of the twentieth century. Writers usually include Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, James, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Faulkner. (Every two years)
ENG 367. Contemporary Drama (3 hours)
A study of some of the most inventive and transformative contemporary playwrights, from Tom Stoppard and Maria Irene Fornes to Tony Kushner and Suzan-Lori Parks. Students will explore plays which dare and defy audiences to look beneath the surface of middle-class life to find what lies urgent and unexpressed below. (Every two years)
ENG 368. Contemporary Poetry (3 hours)
A study of major poets and their influences and of the forms, movements, conventions, and adaptations in poetry of the last three decades. Topics include postmodernism, multiculturalism, postcolonialism, confessionalism, New Formalism, translation, feminism, the Black Arts movement, and open form. (Every two years)
ENG 369. Contemporary Fiction (3 hours)
A study of major fiction writers and their influences and of the forms, movements, conventions, and adaptations of fiction of the last three decades. Topics include realism, magical realism, postmodernism, minimalism, regionalism, hyper-realism, absurdism, metafiction, and the continuing evolution of the short story. (Every two years)
ENG 371. Beginning Playwriting (3 hours)
(Same as THR 371)
The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the conventions and techniques of playwriting. Students will complete exercises leading to the creation of an original one-act play. (Occasionally)
ENG 372. Screenwriting (3 hours)
The art, craft, and business of screenwriting from theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics include: the nature of screenplay formats and structures; creation and development of premise, plot, character, and action; scene writing; adaptation issues; place of the screenwriter in the collaborative process of film making; and marketing strategies. (Occasionally)
ENG 378. Images of Women in Literature (3 hours)
(Same as WGS 378)
A study of the literary representation of women, with emphasis on the lives and careers of women writers. Authors covered may include Austen, Bronte, Wharton, Woolf, Morrison, and others. (Every two years)
ENG 382. Special Topics in Literature and Film: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A study of some significant topic in literature and film not included in the regular departmental offerings. May be taken twice for credit in the English major if the topic varies. (Every two years)
ENG 383. Special Topics in Author Study: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A study of no more than two authors of literature written in English not included in the regular departmental author study offerings. Students will explore in depth an important and influential author (or possibly two authors) and works in context. May be taken twice for credit in the English major. (Occasionally)
ENG 384. Special Topics in Genre Study: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A study of a genre of literature written in English not included in the regular departmental offerings. Students will explore multiple examples of a literary genre by several authors, either within a defined time period or across periods. May be taken twice for credit in the English major. (Occasionally)
ENG 385. Special Topics in Historical or Cultural Study: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A study of literature written in English that represents a historical period or culture not included in the regular departmental offerings. Students will explore diverse works by several authors within the historical contexts of a defined period, or with the focus emphasizing a cultural or interdisciplinary approach. May be taken twice for credit in the English major. (Occasionally)
ENG 386. Special Topics in Language Study or Writing: (Subtitle) (3 hours)
A study of language or practice of writing not included in the regular departmental offerings. Students will study language as a system of meaning through linguistic analysis, rhetorical analysis, or writing for multiple contexts, genres, or purposes. May be taken twice for credit in the English major. (Occasionally)
ENG 390. Public Writing (3 hours)
The study and practice of public writing—writing that serves professional goals and/or the public interest. Students will be introduced to a range of public writing genres and rhetorical strategies, study rhetoric and argumentation at an advanced level, and explore ethical issues found in writing for and within the public sphere. (Occasionally)
ENG 480S. Seminar in Literature (3 hours)
Prerequisite: senior standing.
A study of some significant topic in English or American literature not included in the regular departmental offerings. May not be repeated for credit. (Every semester)
ENG 483. Advanced Playwriting Workshop (3 hours)
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing; ENG/THR 371 and ENG372. A portfolio (two complete plays) approved by the instructor may substitute for ENG/THR 371 and/or ENG 372.
Students will write and revise one play with assistance from readers' theater criticism conducted by classmates and will assemble a portfolio of three complete plays. Offered as needed for playwriting students unable to enroll in ENG 485 (Sams Seminar in Drama). (Occasionally)
ENG 484. Directed Independent Reading (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: junior or senior status and consent of instructor.
This course provides the student with the opportunity to do guided intensive reading in a literary field of his or her interest under the direction of the instructor selected. The student will be expected to meet regularly with the instructor and to present written evidence of his or her critical ability and aesthetic appreciation. Students must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least one contact hour, or equivalent, per week for every hour of credit. Variable credit 1-3 hours, not to exceed 3 hours total. (Occasionally)
ENG 485. The Ferrol Sams, Jr., Distinguished Chair of English Seminar in Fiction, Poetry, or Drama (3 hours)
Prerequisite: successful completion of appropriate creative writing courses or consent of instructor.
This course will provide an opportunity for students to study advanced creative writing under an accomplished artist. (Every year)
ENG 487. Advanced Creative Writing Workshop (3 hours)
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, ENG 310, 311, or 312.
The course follows a workshop format wherein students critique one another’s work, hone their editing skills, and study the editorial standards of strong presses and practicing writers. The course also explores matters of form and researching markets for written work. (Occasionally)
ENG 488. Independent Study for Honors in English (3 hours)
Open to qualified senior English majors and offered fall semester of each year. Working under the direction of a member of the English Department and with the approval of the chair, the student will complete by March 15 of his or her senior year an essay project of scholarly merit. Three hours credit will be awarded on satisfactory completion of the project, and an Honors designation will be entered in the student record. (Occasionally)
ENG 498. Internship in Editing, Writing, or Research (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: declaration of an English major.
An internship of at least 15 weeks at an approved business, organization, or academic institution in which a student’s on-the-job responsibilities pertain to editing, writing, or literary or documentary research. The student will serve as an apprentice under professional supervision; in addition to performing assigned tasks, students will learn through observation, regular discussion with the supervisor and a Mercer professor, and written reflection. The course may be repeated for a total maximum of nine hours. Students will be graded on the S/U basis. (Every semester)