MaconCatalog : College of Liberal Arts and Sciences : ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS : CHEMISTRY (CHM)
 
CHEMISTRY (CHM)
Jeffrey D. Hugdahl, Chair/Professor of Chemistry
Caryn S. Seney, Associate Chair/Professor of Chemistry
Silvia Bridges, Senior Lecturer
Kevin M. Bucholtz, Professor
Garland L. Crawford, Associate Professor
Jennifer Crawford, Lecturer
David R. Goode, Associate Professor
David R. Goode, Associate Professor
Joseph D. Keene, Assistant Professor
Adam M. Kiefer, Distinguished University Professor
Kathryn D. Kloepper, Associate Professor
Emilianne M. Limbrick, Assistant Professor
Margaret Meadows, Assistant Professor
Dale E. Moore, Professor
Andrew J. Pounds, Professor
Kerry M. Strickland, Assistant Professor
 
The Department of Chemistry fosters an understanding of the chemical foundations that are central to the chemical, physical, and biological sciences. The Department of Chemistry offers a Chemistry major that leads to the Bachelor of Science degree, a Chemical Commerce major that leads to the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree (see details under the CHEMICAL COMMERCE heading), and contributes to the major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology that leads to a Bachelor of Science degree (see details under the BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY heading).
 
Major in Chemistry
53 semester credit hours minimum
One from:
CHM 111-112. General Chemistry I and II
CHM 115. Advanced General Chemistry (major is 50 hours minimum with this option)
CHM 221. Organic Chemistry I
CHM 241. Quantitative Analysis
CHM 311. Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 330. Physical Chemistry
CHM 371. Problems in Chemistry I
CHM 372. Problems in Chemistry II
9 hours in advanced coursework, which must include two laboratory courses. Up to four hours of undergraduate research (CHM 295, 401, and/or 402) may be counted toward the major.
Laboratory courses:
CHM 222. Organic Chemistry II
CHM 295. Chemical Research
CHM 401. Senior Research I
CHM 402. Senior Research II
CHM 481L. Advanced Topics in Chemistry
BMB 465L. Biochemistry Lab (requires BMB 465)
BMB 467. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Capstone Lab (requires BMB 465 and BIO 310)
Non-laboratory courses:
CHM 341. Instrumental Analysis
CHM 433. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics
CHM 435. Theoretical Chemistry
CHM 481. Advanced Topics in Chemistry
BMB. 466. Biochemistry II (requires BMB 465)
MAT 133. Precalculus (may be exempted by achieving a specific score on the Math Index or Math Placement Test)
MAT 191. Calculus I
MAT 192. Calculus II
One two-course sequence from:
PHY 141-142. Introductory Physics I and II
PHY 161-162. General Physics I and II
Successful completion of a senior comprehensive examination is required.
 
A student may elect a program that will result in American Chemical Society certification in chemistry or certification in chemistry with an emphasis in biochemistry. To meet the requirements for certification in chemistry, students must complete BMB 465 and three additional departmentally approved laboratory courses. For certification in chemistry with an emphasis in biochemistry, coursework must include BMB 465 and BMB 466, three additional departmentally approved laboratory courses, and one additional course in Biology chosen from BIO 303, 310, and 460.
Departmental Honors in chemistry may be attained by fulfilling the following requirements: (1) select an Honors faculty advisor in chemistry by the end of the semester in which one accumulates 96 semester credit hours and keep this advisor informed of progress toward satisfying the Honors requirements; (2) complete the B.S. major in chemistry with a grade point average of 3.50 or above in the major; (3) complete at least 4 semester credit hours of chemical research (CHM 401 and CHM 402) with a grade point average of 3.00 or above; and (4) write a paper of publishable quality on an approved topic in the chemical research project.
 
Minor in Chemistry
15 semester credit hours minimum
One option from:
CHM 111 and CHM 112. General Chemistry I and II
CHM 115. Advanced General Chemistry
Seven to eleven additional credit hours in CHM courses
MAT 133. Precalculus (may be exempted by achieving a specific score on the Math Index or Math Placement Test)
No more than one credit hour of CHM 295 may be counted toward the minor.
 
Secondary Teacher Certification Program in Chemistry
A major in secondary science education with certification for teaching grades 6-12 is available in chemistry as a separate Bachelor of Science in Education degree through the College of Education. Students planning to teach chemistry in secondary schools should notify their advisor and contact the chair of teacher education in the College of Education. Please consult the COLLEGE OF EDUCATION section of this catalog for complete degree requirements. This certification is approved by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission.
Students who want a major in chemistry as well as certification for teaching in grades 6-12 may either (1) complete the requirements for two bachelor’s degrees or (2) qualify for certification through a post-baccalaureate program such as the Master of Arts in Teaching. See the requirements for dual degrees in the ACADEMIC INFORMATION section of this catalog (under Second Degree); see the GRADUATE STUDIES section of this catalog, College of Education, for information about the M.A.T. program.
CHM 110. The Chemical World (4 hours)
An introduction to chemical theories and principles as related to the world around us. This course will introduce students to fundamental chemical concepts such as atomic theory, conservation of mass, bonding theory, chemical equilibria and the ideal gas law in relation to real-world scenarios. This lecture and laboratory course is intended for non-majors and so will neither satisfy course requirements for the chemistry major or minor, nor serve as a prerequisite for any upper-division chemistry course. (Every year)
CHM 111. General Chemistry I (4 hours)
Prerequisite: MAT 133 credit or placement in MAT 191.
CHM 111 is the first course in a two-part sequence that introduces students to the fundamental principles of chemistry. Students will become conversant with the scientific vernacular through the study of theories, laws and hypotheses of mass, energy and charge balance and how they apply to energy and equilibria. The course introduces the foundational methods of science and principles of chemistry, such as states of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, oxidation and reduction, solutions, acids and bases, kinetic molecular theory, and gas laws. The course includes three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory each week. (Every year)
CHM 112. General Chemistry II (4 hours)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in CHM 111.
CHM 112 is the second course in a two-part sequence that introduces students to the fundamental principles of chemistry. This course is a continuation of principles developed in General Chemistry I. The course includes three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory each week. (Every year)
CHM 115. Advanced General Chemistry (5 hours)
Co- or prerequisite: MAT 191.
CHM 115 is an accelerated general chemistry course that seeks to unify many of the themes in General Chemistry to develop a comprehensive understanding of the subject. Students in CHM 115 will be introduced to the microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of matter and its behavior. They will be exposed to the fundamental laws of mass and energy conservation and their application to chemical systems and reactions. Students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics and its bearing on equilibrium in gases, acids and bases, and ionic solutions. The course includes three one-hour lectures, one three-hour laboratory, and one one-hour computational recitation each week. (Occasionally)
CHM 181/181L. Introductory Topic in Chemistry: (Subtitle) (1-4 hours)
Prerequisites: No CHM prerequisite; other prerequisites to be specified with each individual course offering.
Study of an introductory topic in chemistry not covered in any of the normal departmental offerings. The number of lecture and/or laboratory meetings will vary according to the topic. Students must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least one contact hour, or equivalent, per week for every hour of credit. This course may be applied to the chemistry major or minor and may be repeated for credit if offered with a different topic. (Occasionally)
CHM 221. Organic Chemistry I (4 hours)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in CHM 112 or CHM 115.
A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds. The various functional groups and their transformations are studied systematically. Reaction mechanisms and the formulation of synthetic schemes are emphasized. Basic theory and interpretation of ultraviolet/visible, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies and mass spectrometry are discussed. Laboratory work involves the separation, preparation, and both chemical and instrumental analysis of organic compounds. The course includes three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory each week. (Every year)
CHM 222. Organic Chemistry II (4 hours)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in CHM 221.
A continuation of CHM 221. The course includes three lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory each week. (Every year)
CHM 241. Quantitative Analysis (4 hours)
Prerequisite: CHM 112 or CHM 115.
A study of the fundamental techniques and theories of quantitative chemical analysis. Emphasis is given to limitations of chemical measurement, instrumentation selection, calibration methods, quality assurance, and the statistical and ethical treatment of analytical data. A thorough study of equilibria as it pertains to acid/base, precipitation, complexation, and redox phenomena is included. Laboratory work includes multiple methods of chemical and instrumental analysis with an emphasis on data analysis. The course includes three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. (Every spring)
CHM 281/281L. Special Topic in Chemistry: (Subtitle) (1-4 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 112 recommended; other prerequisites to be specified with each individual course offering.
Study of a special topic in chemistry requiring appropriate background in general chemistry and not covered in any of the normal department offerings. The number of lecture and/or laboratory meetings will vary according to the topic. This course cannot be applied toward the chemistry major requirements and does not count toward any of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences general education requirements, but it can be applied toward the chemistry minor. Students must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least one contact hour, or equivalent, per week for every hour of credit. May be repeated for credit if offered with a different topic. (Occasionally)
CHM 295. Chemical Research (1-2 hours)
Participation in an independent research problem directed by one or more faculty members. One hour of credit will be awarded for three hours per week per semester of satisfactory participation. A maximum of two credits can be earned per semester. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six semester credit hours. (Every semester)
CHM 311. Inorganic Chemistry (3 hours)
Prerequisite: CHM 221.
A survey of the chemistry of the elements, including main group, transition metal, and organometallic compounds in both inorganic and biological systems. An examination of acid-base and redox properties of these compounds is included. This course presents the structure, bonding, and reactivity of inorganic compounds through three one-hour lectures each week. (Every year)
CHM 330. Physical Chemistry (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 112 or 115, MAT 192.
More in-depth coverage of physical chemistry topics than provided in general chemistry. Course topics include the laws of thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, statistical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, quantum theory, molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Students will work with examples drawn from chemistry and biochemistry. Course meetings include three lecture hours per week. (Every fall)
CHM 341. Instrumental Analysis (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 222, 241.
A study of the instruments that are used for separation (such as gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography) and spectroscopic methods of analysis (including infrared, ultraviolet/visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, atomic absorption, atomic emission, and mass spectrometry). Attention is given to the block diagrams and the basic theory of the various instruments. (Every year)
CHM 371. Problems in Chemistry I (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 221 and CHM 241.
This laboratory capstone course features experimental projects designed to integrate concepts and techniques in chemistry. Students learn to research, evaluate, and apply appropriate chemical literature to novel research projects. Formal written laboratory reports are required and instruction on how to write within the discipline of chemistry is provided. The course includes six hours of laboratory and one hour of writing instruction per week. (Every fall)
CHM 372. Problems in Chemistry II (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 371 and CHM 330.
A continuation of CHM 371, this laboratory capstone course features experimental projects designed to integrate concepts and techniques in chemistry. Students learn how to prepare presentations using primary research and the laboratory projects associated with this course. Formal written laboratory reports and formal presentations appropriate to the field are required. The course includes six hours of laboratory and one hour of instruction on formal presentation per week. (Every spring)
CHM 395. Chemistry Seminar (1 hour)
Prerequisite: CHM 222.
A seminar series consisting of meetings to discuss articles in all areas of chemistry from the current chemical literature. Students will prepare presentations on primary research articles and serve as discussion leaders. The course includes one one-hour seminar per week. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two hours of credit. (Every year)
CHM 398. Internship in Chemistry (1-3 hours)
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.
An intensive practicum experience at an approved business, organization, or academic institution. Students, under the direction of a faculty member and an on-site supervisor, must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least three on- site hours per week for every hour of credit. Students will learn through observation, regular discussions with the on-site supervisor and Mercer faculty member, and written reflection. In addition, students may be required to attend training events, workshops or weekly seminars. This course may be repeated for a total of 9 hours and does not count toward a major or minor in Chemistry. (Every year)
CHM 401. Senior Research I (1-2 hours)
Prerequisite: senior status.
Independent research directed by a faculty member. Students work toward laboratory research goals prepared in consultation with a faculty mentor. The course includes approximately three hours in the laboratory each week per credit hour. (Every year)
CHM 402. Senior Research II (1-2 hours)
Prerequisite: CHM 401.
Independent research directed by a faculty member. Students work toward laboratory research goals prepared in consultation with a faculty mentor. Oral presentations are required. The course includes approximately three hours in the laboratory each week per credit hour. (Every year)
CHM 433. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Dynamics (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 330 and senior status.
A course devoted to topics in chemical kinetics and reaction dynamics more advanced than those covered in CHM 330. Course topics include modern experimental chemical kinetics, complex reaction mechanisms, dynamics of molecular encounters, state-to-state kinetics, and transition state theory. Students will work with examples from traditional and contemporary chemistry literature. Course meetings include three lecture hours per week. (Every two years)
CHM 435. Theoretical Chemistry (3 hours)
Prerequisites: CHM 330 and senior status.
A course devoted to topics in quantum chemistry and statistical thermodynamics more advanced than those covered in CHM 330. Concepts from symmetry, quantum mechanics, and statistical thermodynamics will be applied to the description of structure and bonding. The use of theory to predict the spectroscopic, physical, and thermal properties of atomic and molecular systems will also be presented and the interconnection between theory and experiment demonstrated. Advanced computational tools will be utilized throughout the course as appropriate. Course meetings include three lecture hours per week. (Every two years)
CHM 481/481L. Advanced Topic in Chemistry: (Subtitle) (1-4 hours)
Study of an advanced topic in chemistry in greater depth than in any of the normal department offerings. The number of lecture and/or laboratory meetings will vary according to the topic. This course can be applied toward the requirements for the major or minor in chemistry and toward the American Chemical Society certified degree program. Students must engage in projects or assignments requiring at least one contact hour, or equivalent, per week for every hour of credit. May be repeated for credit if offered with a different topic. (Every year)